Aug 24, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


TEP Acronyms

AL - Artistic Literacy IC - Innovation & Creativity SL - Servant Leadership
AW - Advanced Writing ID - Identity TECH - Computer Technology
CAP -  Capstone OC - Oral Communication TW - Teamwork
CT -  Critical Thinking QL - Math WC - Written Communication
FL - Foreign Language/Sign Language SCL - Science with Lab WEL - Wellness
GP - Global Perspective    

 

 
  
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    HON 300 - Level Series Honors Seminar


    Honors interdisciplinary seminars are explorations of specific topics designed to demonstrate the interconnectedness of academic disciplines and promote interdisciplinary analysis and problem-solving. These courses are designed to reinforce college-level thinking, writing, and discussion. Topics will vary. (1-4)
  
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    HON 399 - Honors Research Seminar II


    The course is a continuation of HON 398 and requires students to meet weekly with the instructor and thesis advisor. A draft of the thesis must be completed by mid-semester. All these must be completed and defended prior to graduation. A research or thesis course in the department may be substituted for this course. (1-4)
  
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    HON 400 - Honors Research Project


    This senior level course is reserved for students in the Honors Program who plan to graduate with the Honors Program designation. Students will work with a major professor and with the Honors Program Director to design a research project. (A research or thesis course in the department may be substituted for this course). A significant research paper is expected for class and/or conference presentation. (3-4)
  
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    HON 499 - Honors Thesis and Defense


    Honors Thesis course will be offered on an independent study basis and is suggested for students in their junior or senior year. The Honors Thesis culminates in a comprehensive written report describing the research project and an oral defense of the thesis is also required. If the student is required to write a thesis as part of the standard program of study in the major, that departmental thesis may be expanded to an Honors Thesis standards. A creative endeavor with written explanation of the creative process and conclusion may also be accepted as an Honors Thesis. Prerequisites: Permission of the Honors College and Major Department. (3-4)
  
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    HSEP 101 - Foundations in Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness


    This course examines the most sophisticated theories by terrorist analyst, while focusing on the international threats of terrorism and the basic security issues that surround terrorism today. This course will also examine the interaction between the law enforcement and intelligence communities, civil liberties, and theories of war and police work.  Prerequisite CJ 101, or POLS 100 or PSYCH 132 with Lab.  (3)
  
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    HSEP 102 - Political Terrorism


     This course is an introduction to the basic tasks of emergency preparedness and disaster mitigation, including planning, response, and recovery.  Special emphasis will be placed on command arrangements, coordination, and budgetary issues among emergency responders (law enforcement, firefighters, and health care system officials), and within and between federal, state, and local governments.  Prerequisites HSEP 101 (3)
  
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    HSEP 202 - Emergency Planning and Incident Management


    This course is an introduction to the basic tasks of emergency preparedness and disaster mitigation, including planning, response, and recovery.  Special emphasis will be placed on command arrangements, coordination, and budgetary issues among emergency responders (law enforcement, firefighters, and health care system officials), and within and between federal, state, and local governments.  Prerequisites: HSEP 101 (3)
  
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    HSEP 300 - Risk and Vulnerability


    An introduction to analytical techniques and methodologies for threat vulnerability assessments of various types of public and private infrastructure. An all hazard approach is employed, considering natural disasters, system failures, terrorist attacks (conventional or weapons of mass destruction). Special attention will be focused on critical infrastructure protection as well as cyber-terrorism. Prerequisite: HSEP 101  (3)
  
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    HSEP 302 - Strategic Planning for Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness


    This course is designed to give the student an overview of homeland security law and policy. We will explore emergency response, emergency management and terrorism after 9/11. Topics include: the law for first time responders, incident management, weapons of mass destruction, volunteers, Governors’ powers, FEMA, Department of Homeland Security, civil rights, and international anti-terrorism efforts.  Prerequisite: HSEP 101 (3)
  
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    HSEP 304 - Legal and Constitutional Issues in Homeland Security


    Computer Crime Law is dynamic and rapidly evolving, different from traditional criminal law and yet similar.  How are the substantive crimes, the means of investigation, and the jurisdiction of computer crimes different from most traditional crimes and what are the similarities? Prerequisite  HSEP 101 (3)
  
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    IHS 100 - Environmental Health


    A survey of the effects of human activities on the environment and the resulting environmental impact on human health. Air pollution, water resources and pollution, solid, hazardous and radioactive waste, vector control and food safety are among topics covered in this course. (3)
  
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    IHS 100L - Environmental Health Laboratory


    Laboratory sessions will include presentations by guest lecturers with expertise in specific course matter, multi-media presentations supportive of lecture topics, locating, searching, retrieving, and analyzing environmental health data, and readings in environmental health. Fee required. (3 hours per week) (1)
  
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    INTBU 330 - Introduction to African Society, Commerce and Resources


    This course is designed to give students a historical and contemporary overview of the political, economic and sociocultural structures found across sub-Saharan Africa, particularly with regard to the Bantu peoples, the most predominant sociolinguistic and ethnic category of people on the African Continent. The common philosophical themes of the Bantu peoples and “survival skills” in Kiswahili, the major language of Africa and the Bantu. A discussion of major cities, production areas, industries and natural resources across sub-Saharan Africa will be presented and incorporated as part of the comparison and contrast of Bantu societies by geographical region. (3)
  
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    INTBU 360 - International Trade


    A study of the principles of international trade patterns, theories of absolute and comparative advantage, classical and modern trade theory, tariffs, quotas, non-tariff barriers, and preferential trading arrangements. Prerequisites: ECON 235  and ECON 236 . (3)
  
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    INTBU 451 - International Business


    This primary objective of this course is to provide an understanding of an international perspective on the part of business managers. Provides an integrative framework for the study of the economic and competitive environment in which international business firms operate, and discusses the impact of these environments upon managerial tasks and decisions. Prerequisites: ECON 235  and ECON 236 .
  
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    INTBU 480 - Global Research


    In this course, students will use the Internet as a primary tool to assist them in researching countries, inclusive of the United States, from variety of criteria and perspective (e.g. demography, economics, contemporary issues, natural resources, etc.). Application software, primarily Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint, will be utilized in the documentation and presentation phases of the research efforts. Prerequisites: CIS 240  and GEO 332 . (3)
  
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    INTBU 486 - International Business Law


    The study of legal principles governing international trade, focusing on broad contemporary unifying activities found in international conventions such as the European Economic Community Act, the International Banking Act, and the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act. Prerequisites: INTBU 360 . (3)
  
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    INTBU 487 - International Marketing


    The study of principles affecting international marketing designed to acquaint students with the growing importance of world marketing in the United States and the strategic issues involved. Prerequisites: BUS 251 . (3)
  
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    INTBU 488 - International Comparative Management


    The study of corporate management styles of the United States and its major trading partners, and the effects of overseas investments of foreign economies with emphasis on the emerging managerial structures. Prerequisites: INTBU 360 . (3)
  
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    INTBU 489 - International Economic Policy


    The study of current economic developments in foreign and United States economic policy. Topics include: international economic aid, trade, the United States’ role in the international economy; exchange rate instability; balance of payments problems; and the role of institutions such as World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and GATT. Prerequisites: INTBU 360 . (3)
  
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    INTBU 490 - Special Topics in International Studies


    This capstone course provides an opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge and abilities acquired through prior study. Students do projects and seminar on topics selected on the basis of new and emerging business procedures, technology, and standards of practice in International Business. Evaluation process includes the writing and preparation of business research projects. Prerequisites: BUS 132  and ENGL 290 . (3)
  
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    LEAD 101 - Foundations of Leadership


    In this course students will become familiar with different ways of exercising leadership, their own strengths and weaknesses, and how they can best work with others in a leadership context. They will learn and apply leadership skills in a hands-on practical way that encourages them to challenge their own beliefs and assumptions about what constitutes leadership. This course offers a comprehensive review of contemporary issues and perspectives on leadership, including multi-disciplinary and systems-oriented approaches as well as classic theory, moving to the examination of evolving contemporary beliefs. The emphasis is on application of concepts in actual leadership settings and situations. Topics include development of leadership theories, personal assessment and development, values and ethics, motivation, power, followership, group dynamics, multiculturalism in leadership, conflict resolution, performance excellence, and the change process. Through a process of readings, self-discovery, group observations, and case studies, the student will identify, observe, analyze, and apply new leadership behaviors. This course is based on the premise that each student will face a variety of leadership challenges in life. How these challenges are met, whether as a formal leader or a member of a team, can have a significant impact on an organization and on one’s career. Learning more about leadership will help every student meet their leadership challenges. (3) T1 SL
  
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    LEAD 201 - Leadership and Organizational Behavior


    A substantial portion of the variation in organizational (and subordinate) outcomes can be attributed to leadership. This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of leadership as a phenomenon and its impact on the organizational behavior of individuals. Major theories of leadership will be examined and leadership will be integrated to various internal and external organizational factors. Students will learn to think critically about the leadership phenomenon and about the boundary conditions of leadership theories. Theories of leadership (e.g., trait, behavioral, contingency, and neo-charismatic transformational approaches). Various topics will be linked to leadership including: gender, power, ethics, job design and motivation, personality, national culture, and leader development. Prerequisite: LEAD 101 . (3)
  
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    LEAD 301 - Leadership Roles in the Community and in Your Profession


    The Principles of Leadership course will prepare students for leadership roles in the community and in their professions. The course will provide students with the knowledge, skills, and foundation in Leadership necessary to be effective in a variety of settings. Students will develop an understanding of the components that make leadership successful. Students will gain both the theoretical and practical skills necessary for success in both their personal and professional lives. It is intended for students who are interested in gaining a foundation in leadership studies and extended coursework in applied aspects of Leadership. What does that mean? First, what this course is not. Principles of Leadership is not a survey of the latest popular books on leadership from the airport bookshop. This course is a scholarly exploration of the complex concept of leadership. We will consider leadership theories and approaches, delve into research on leadership, examine leadership themes in historical and modern texts, and consider how all of this applies to real world situations - including your own life! Prerequisite: LEAD 101 . (3)
  
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    LIS 150 - Critical Writing Seminar: Concepts in Popular Culture


    Intensive writing seminar focused on critical interpretation of cultural texts. Emphasis will be placed on the development of reading, writing, and thinking skills that reflect students’ ability to evaluate information and reason accordingly. Students will study a variety of cultural texts in an effort to broaden their frame of reference for academic inquiry and thereby facilitate their ability to transfer the reading, writing and thinking skills that they acquire. Cultural texts can range from reading assignments with a cultural focus to cultural artifacts, such as magazines, television programs, films, music, and art. Writing assignments will require students to decode these cultural texts while demonstrating proficiency with academic writing skills. These skills include knowledge of The Writing Process, conventions and documentation styles of various academic disciplines, and rhetorical modes. (3)
  
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    LIS 200 - Autobiography-Self in the World


    Focus on the concept of the self. The topic is approached through autobiographical writing as well as reading autobiographical texts of historical importance and of contemporary value. Texts will vary. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  or permission of instructor. (3)
  
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    LIS 221 - Interdisciplinary Perspectives in the Humanities


    A multidisciplinary study of the humanities in conjunction with other disciplines. The goal of this course is to apply the perspectives of two or more disciplines to problems of current concern in relation to the past. Topics will vary. General Education requirement. This course cannot be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisites ENGL 131  and ENGL 132 . (3)
  
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    LIS 300 - Local Identities in the Global Village


    A seminar that explores the relation between cultural practices in everyday life within economic, political, geographical and historical contexts. It pursues to foster more open analytic, critical and political conversations by encouraging students to dialogue on controversial topics. It also aims to provide the necessary theoretical background to understand the processes by which the existing disciplines, institutions and structures of power are reproduced, resisted and transformed. Topics and texts will vary by academic year. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  or permission of instructor. (3)
  
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    LIS 301 - World: the Self and Community in Global Perspective


    A seminar emphasizing interdisciplinary topics in world cultures and incorporating active student participation in an issue of global significance. Students are encouraged to reflect upon ways their own autobiography and membership in a cultural community impact their perspective on world cultures. Topics and texts will vary by academic year. Prerequisites: ENGL 131 , LIS 221  or permission of instructor. (3)
  
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    LIS 400 - Service Learning Internship


    The service learning internship allows the student to participate in an off-site internship for no less than forty-five hours that focuses on community service and development. This service project will be selected with careful regard to the student’s core focus of study. The student will apply their focus of study to a real world problem. Students will be evaluated both in terms of participation and academic grounds.
  
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    LIS 450 - Interdisciplinary Topics in Contemporary Contexts


    This course uses contemporary issues to draw connections between disciplines. It incorporates problem-solving discussion of a current issue and illustrates how study of a particular discipline cultivates point of view. Students will craft a capstone project that utilizes more than one method of inquiry and that conveys an understanding of the multidisciplinary nature of knowledge. Topics and texts will vary by academic year. Prerequisites: ENGL 131 , LIS 221 , LIS 300  or permission of instructor. (3)
  
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    MATH 130 - Introduction to College Algebra


    Operations involving fractions, decimals, percent, and signed numbers, equations and inequalities, exponents and radicals, operations with polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, applications. This course is a prerequisite for incoming students needing additional instruction before taking MATH 131 . Students must pass this course with a grade of a “C” or better before advancing to MATH 131 . (Not applicable to general education, transformative education program, or major requirements) (3)
  
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    MATH 130SP - Introduction to College Algebra-Self Paced


    This course covers the fundamental principles of operations involving fractions, decimals, percent, and signed numbers, equations and inequalities, exponents and radicals, operations with polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, and applications. This is a self-paced course. Students will work at home and in the computer lab, using online video lectures, PowerPoint presentations, per-tests, end of chapter quizzes, and one on one time with the professor and tutors. (Not applicable to general education, transformative education program, or major requirements) (3)
  
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    MATH 131 - College Algebra


    Sets, functions, graphs, equations, inequalities, exponents, logarithms, progressions, binomial theorem, permutations and combinations, systems of linear equations, matrices and determinants, and mathematical induction. (3) T1 QL
  
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    MATH 131CL - College Algebra/Lab


    This is an hybrid course that covers the fundamental principles of sets, functions, graphs, equations, inequalities, exponents, logarithms, progressions, binomial theorem, permutations and combinations, systems of linear equations, matrices and determinants, mathematical induction, and consumer mathematics. In addition, students are expected to complete two to four modules or segments using an interactive learning environment called My Math Lab. (3) T1 QL
  
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    MATH 132 - Finite Mathematics


    Recommended for Business and Social Science majors. Probability, elementary statistics, linear programming and use of a graphing calculator. Prerequisites: MATH 131 . (3)
  
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    MATH 135 - Algebra and Trigonometry


    An in-depth study of the topics covered in MATH 131  and MATH 133 . Note that: MATH 131  and MATH 133 , with a grade of C or better in each, are equivalent to MATH 135. Students must pass this course with a grade of a “C” or better. A graphing calculator is required. (4)
  
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    MATH 174 - Discrete Mathematics


    Binary number system, logic, truth tables, Boolean algebra, logic gates, vectors, matrices, linear equations, probability and statistics, order relations, graphs, graph theory, unstructured data types, and directed gates. Prerequisites: MATH 131 . (3)
  
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    MATH 201 - Introductory Statistics


    Descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous random variables, statistical quality control, regression and correlation. The course gives students a working knowledge of statistics. Prerequisites: MATH 131 . (3)
  
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    MATH 224 - Business Calculus


    A brief treatment of basic concepts of differential and integral calculus with applications to business, economic, social and behavioral; polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisites: MATH 135 . (4)
  
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    MATH 230 - Introduction to Logic


    Premises and conclusions, deduction and induction, fallacies, propositions and inferences, symbolic logic, paradoxes and methods of deduction. Prerequisites: MATH 131   (3)
  
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    MATH 231 - Calculus I


    Limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and trigonometric functions, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisites:  MATH 135 (4)
  
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    MATH 232 - Calculus II


    Area, volume, and other applications of integration, derivatives and integrals of transcendental functions, techniques of integration. Prerequisites: MATH 231 . (4)
  
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    MATH 233 - Modern Mathematics


    Introduction to elementary logic, fundamentals of set theory, problem solving techniques, calculators and computers, introduction to algebra, and introduction to statistics. Prerequisites: MATH 131 . (3)
  
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    MATH 290 - Linear Algebra


    Linear equations, matrices, vectors, linear transformations, determinants, operations with matrices, eigenvalues and applications. Prerequisites: MATH 131  or MATH 135 . (3)
  
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    MATH 330 - Modern Math


    This course introduces students to research based methods for learning, teaching, and assessing mathematics, the fundamentals of number theory, calculators, and computers, basic concepts and structures in Geometry, Algebra, Probability and Statistics. This course will focus upon understanding mathematical concepts and developing appropriate lessons and strategies for teaching those concepts to children. Prerequisites: MATH 131 . (3)
  
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    MATH 331 - Calculus III


    Infinite series, Taylor and McLaurin series, Taylor’s series, polar coordinates, partial differentiation, multiple integration and applications. Prerequisites: MATH 232 . (4)
  
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    MATH 332 - Introduction to Real Analysis


    A study of rigorous development of the real number system, sequences and series, sets, limits, continuity and differentiability of functions and the Riemann integral. Prerequisites: MATH 331 . (3)
  
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    MATH 334 - Modern Algebra


    Sets, relations and functions, number systems, groups, rings, fields, polynomials over a field, and linear algebra. Prerequisites: MATH 290 . (3)
  
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    MATH 335 - Modern Geometry


    Review of basic Euclidean and Analytic Geometry. Geometric transformations, fractal geometry, introduction to non-Euclidean geometries, and topological transformations. Prerequisites: MATH 331 . (3)
  
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    MATH 338 - Differential Equations


    Methods of solutions of ordinary differential equations, applications, solution by series. Prerequisites: MATH 331 . (3)
  
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    MATH 339 - Introduction to Applied Mathematics


    This course will cover Fourier analysis, Partial differential equations, complex variables, Taylor and Laurent series and Residue theory. Prerequisites: MATH 338 . (3)
  
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    MATH 340 - Theory of Numbers


    Study of the elementary properties if integers, prime and composite numbers. Topics also include Euclidean Algorithm, congruence’s, Diophantine equations, Chinese Remainder Theorem, Fermat’s and Wilson’s Theorems. Prerequisites: MATH 231 . (3)
  
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    MATH 412 - Numerical Analysis


    This course will cover computational procedures using the computer, linear systems, and root approximation of algebraic and transcendental equations, approximating functions by interpolating polynomials, and numerical differentiation and integration. Prerequisites: CSC 305  and MATH 331 . (3)
  
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    MATH 425 - Mathematics Seminars


    Recommended for mathematics majors during the second semester of their senior year. Discussion of topics on the modern developments in mathematics not normally covered in the undergraduate program. Problem solving techniques, test-taking skills and critical thinking will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor. (1)
  
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    MATH 433 - Probability and Statistics


    Focusing on the logical development of the framework of mathematical statistics, this course deals with exploratory data analysis techniques, probability, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, confidence methods, and regression analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 232 . (3)
  
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    MATH 435 - Statistical Inference


    This course introduces some of the basic concepts and techniques of statistical inference that are applied to various fields; point and interval estimation of popular parameters; hypothesis testing, including the use of T, X, and F tables. Simple linear regression and correlation. Prerequisites: MATH 433 . (3)
  
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    MATH 450 - Special Topics in Industrial Mathematics


    Solutions to real-world problems from industry. Mathematical modeling and interpretation of results. Various models from a wide range of applications will be studied. Models may include the use of statistics and differential equations. Major topics and issues in industrial mathematics to be chosen by the instructor. Prerequisites: MATH 201 , MATH 290  and MATH 338  . (3)
  
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    MATH 495 - Senior Math Research I


    Supervised introductory research principles with departmental consent. Reports required. Fee required. (3) T1 GP
  
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    MATH 496 - Senior Math Research II


    Supervised research project with departmental consent. Research paper required. Prerequisites: MATH 495 . Fee required. (3)
  
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    MS 101 - Leadership and Personal Development


    MSL 101 introduces cadets to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, goal setting, time management, physical fitness, and stress management relate to leadership, officer ship, and the Army profession. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions while gaining a big picture understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Open to all Students. Fee required (1)
  
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    MS 101L - Leadership Laboratory


    Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Learn and practice basic skills. Gain insight into Advanced Course in order to make an informed decision whether to apply for it. Build self-confidence and team-building leadership skills that can be applied throughout life. (0)
  
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    MS 102 - Introduction to Tactical Leadership


    MSL 102 overviews leadership fundamentals such as setting direction, problem-solving, listening, presenting briefs, providing feedback, and using effective writing skills. Cadets explore dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions in the context of practical, hands-on, and interactive exercises. Continued emphasis is placed on recruitment and retention of cadets. Cadre role models and the building of stronger relationships among the cadets through common experience and practical interaction are critical aspects of the MSL 102 experience. Open to all Students. Fee required (1)
  
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    MS 102L - Leadership Laboratory


    Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Learn and practice basic skills. Gain insight into Advanced Course in order to make an informed decision whether to apply for it. Build self-confidence and team-building leadership skills that can be applied throughout life. (0)
  
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    MS 118 - ROTC Swimming


    All cadets will be given swimming instructions from a certified instructor. At the completion of the course cadets will be able to swim for 10 minutes continuous using any combination of four strokes (breast, side, crawl, back) and after ten minutes of rest 5 minutes of treading water. There is no associated distance with this requirement. Cadet will also be taught Combat Water Survival Test (CWST) which will be administered at LDAC. The CWST consists of a 15 meter Swim with a M-16, wearing ACUs, tennis shoes, and LBE, a 3 meter drop - walk off a 3 meter diving board blindfolded with weapon and LBE, enter the water and remove blindfold, swim to side of pool without losing weapon and Equipment removal - Enter water and discard weapon and LBE. Swim to side of pool. This is a commissioning requirement and either a swim test (credit) or the class is mandatory. (2)
  
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    MS 201 - Innovative Team Leadership


    MS 201 explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles by examining team dynamics and two historical leadership theories that form the basis of the Army leadership framework (trait and behavior theories). Cadets practice aspects of personal motivation and team building in the context of planning, executing, and assessing team exercises and participating in leadership labs. Focus is on continued development of the knowledge of leadership values and attributes through an understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties and basic aspects of land navigation and squad tactics. Case studies provide tangible context for learning the Soldier’s Creed and Warrior Ethos as they apply in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Open to all Students. Fee required (2)
  
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    MS 201L - Leadership Laboratory


    Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Learn and practice basic skills. Gain insight into Advanced Course in order to make an informed decision whether to apply for it. Build self-confidence and team-building leadership skills that can be applied throughout life. (0)
  
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    MS 202 - Foundations of Tactical Leadership


    MS 202 examines the challenges of leading tactical teams in the complex contemporary operating environment (COE). The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, patrolling, and operation orders. Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army leadership framework explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. MS 202 provides a smooth transition into MS 301 . Cadets develop greater self awareness as they assess their own leadership styles and practice communication and team building skills. COE case studies give insight into the importance and practice of teamwork and tactics in real-world scenarios. Open to all Students. Fee required (2)
  
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    MS 202L - Leadership Laboratory


    Open only to (and required of) students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Learn and practice basic skills. Gain insight into Advanced Course in order to make an informed decision whether to apply for it. Build self-confidence and team-building leadership skills that can be applied throughout life. (0)
  
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    MS 210 - Leadership Training Course


    A six-week summer camp conducted at an Army post. The student receives pay. (Travel, lodging and most meals are covered by the Army.) The environment is rigorous, and is similar to Army Basic Training. No military obligation incurred. Open only to students who have not taken all four of MS 101 , MS 102 , MS 201  and MS 202 , and who pass a physical examination (paid for by ROTC). Completion of MS 210 qualifies a student for entry into the Advanced Course. Candidates can apply for a space any time during the school year prior to the summer. Space is limited. (6)
  
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    MS 301 - Adaptive Tactical Leadership


    MS 301 challenges cadets to study, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with challenging scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Cadets receive systematic and specific feedback on their leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, as well as their own self-evaluations, cadets continue to develop their leadership and critical thinking abilities. The focus is developing cadets’ tactical leadership abilities to enable them to succeed at ROTC’s summer Leadership Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). (3)
  
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    MS 301L - Advanced Course Leadership Laboratories


    Open only to students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training and activities with Basic Course students and for the ROTC program as a whole. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions. (0)
  
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    MS 302 - Leadership in Changing Environments


    MS 302 uses increasingly intense situational leadership challenges to build cadet awareness and skills in leading tactical operations up to platoon level. Cadets review aspects of combat, stability, and support operations. They also conduct military briefings and develop proficiency in garrison operation orders. The focus is on exploring, evaluating, and developing skills in decision-making, persuading, and motivating team members in the contemporary operating environment (COE). MSL 302 cadets are evaluated on what they know and do as leaders as they prepare to attend the ROTC summer Leader Development Assessment Course (LDAC). (3)
  
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    MS 302L - Advanced Course Leadership Laboratories


    Open only to students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training and activities with Basic Course students and for the ROTC program as a whole. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions. (0)
  
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    MS 310 - National Advanced Leadership Camp


    A five-week camp conducted at an Army post. Only open to (and required of) students who have completed MS 301  and MS 302 . The student receives pay. Travel, lodging and the U.S. Army defrays most meal costs. The Advanced Camp environment is highly structured and demanding, stressing leadership at small unit levels under varying, challenging conditions. Individual leadership and basic skills performance are evaluated throughout the camp. Although this course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only, the leadership and skills evaluations at the camp weigh heavily in the subsequent selection process that determines the type commission and job opportunities given to the student upon graduation from ROTC and the University. Prerequisites: MS 301  and MS 302 . Cadets will put into practice the leadership, tactical and soldier skills learned in the classroom and lab. (6)
  
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    MS 401 - Developing Adaptive Leaders


    MS 401 develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel processes prepare cadets to make the transition to Army officers. MSL IV cadets analyze, evaluate, and instruct cadets at lower levels. Both their classroom and battalion leadership experiences are designed to prepare MSL 401 cadets for their first unit of assignment. They identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles, and use situational opportunities to teach, train, and develop subordinates. (3) T1 SL
  
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    MS 401L - Advanced Course Leadership Laboratories


    Open only to students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training and activities with Basic Course students and for the ROTC program as a whole. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions. (0)
  
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    MS 402 - Officership


    MS 402 explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the contemporary operating environment (COE). Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing cadets for their first unit of assignment. It uses case studies, scenarios, and “What Now, Lieutenant?” exercises to prepare cadets to face the complex ethical and practical demands of leading as commissioned officers in the United States Army. (3)
  
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    MS 402L - Advanced Course Leadership Laboratories


    Open only to students in the associated Military Science course. Series, with different roles for students at different levels in the program. Involves leadership responsibilities for the planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of various training and activities with Basic Course students and for the ROTC program as a whole. Students develop, practice and refine leadership skills by serving and being evaluated in a variety of responsible positions. (0)
  
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    MS 432 - Survey of Military History


    A performance-based information program designed to examine the lessons of history and apply the lessons to the treatment of contemporary military problems. This objective is accomplished by presenting students an historic survey of warfare and the relationship between the soldier and the state. Required for Commissioning. (3)
  
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    MUS 101 - Marching Band


    All music majors are encouraged to gain experience in instrumental music through membership in concert band. This course is open to any student meeting the eligibility requirements of the director. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: audition. (1)
  
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    MUS 102J - Jazz Ensemble


    Designed to provide experiences in small combinations of orchestral and band instruments. This course will provide instrumentalists with special opportunities to grow through small ensemble performances. This course may be repeated at each level one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Prerequisite: audition Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 103 - Concert Band


    All music majors are encouraged to gain experience in instrumental music through membership in concert band. This course is open to any student meeting the eligibility requirement of the director. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: audition. (1)
  
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    MUS 104 - College Choir


    College Choir is an SATB choral group that performs a diverse repertoire of choral literature and is open to all students. Instruction emphasizes development of vocal technique, musicianship, and performance etiquette. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: audition. (1)
  
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    MUS 105 - Chamber Singers


    A course designed for a select group of vocalists.  The repertoire would include, but not limited to madrigals, show and jazz selections, operatic renditions and other music for small vocal ensembles. Prerequisite:  Audition by Choir Director. (1)
  
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    MUS 108 - Class Piano I


    An introductory group piano course for non-keyboard music majors that provides instruction in basic keyboard skills, reading music, scales, intervals, harmonization, transposition, sight reading, and beginning keyboard repertoire. Students who successfully audition as piano majors will receive credit by examination for the credit hours for the class piano requirement. (1) Prerequisites: Music Majors, Concurrent enrollment in MUS 131  or instructor’s consent (1)
  
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    MUS 109 - Class Piano II


    Continues group piano instruction for non-keyboard music majors in skills and concepts introduced in MUS 108  and includes scales of two octaves, chard progressions with secondary and seventh chards, and simple melodic harmonization. Prerequisites: MUS 108 , Concurrent enrollment in MUS 132  or instructor’s consent. (1)
  
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    MUS 112 - Individual Instrument


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112A - Flute


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112B - Oboe


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112C - Bassoon


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112D - Clarinet


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112E - Saxophone


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112F - Percussion


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112G - Trumpet


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112H - French Horn


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112I - Trombone


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112J - Euphonium


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112K - Tuba


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
  
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    MUS 112L - Violin


    Applied study of solo literature for band or orchestral instruments. A student majoring in music education will select an instrument as his/her major performing medium. Seven to eight hours on one instrument constitutes the minimum requirement to major in that instrument. This course may be repeated one additional time for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Fee required. (1)
 

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