Oct 20, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


TEP Acronyms

AL - Artistic Literacy IC - Innovation & Creativity SL - Servant Leadership
AW - Advanced Writing ID - Identity TECH - Computer Technology
CAP -  Capstone OC - Oral Communication TW - Teamwork
CT -  Critical Thinking QL - Math WC - Written Communication
FL - Foreign Language/Sign Language SCL - Science with Lab WEL - Wellness
GP - Global Perspective    

 

 
  
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    MUS 419 - Basic Conducting


    This course provides instruction in baton technique, non-verbal communication skills, use of the left hand, score preparation, and leadership. Prerequisites: MUS 209 , MUS 232 , MUS 344 . (2)
  
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    MUS 429 - Independent Studies


    Provides an opportunity for students to pursue directed study, upon the approval of faculty. Because much of music instruction is necessarily adapted to strengths and needs of individual students, this course is designed to meet, at the advanced level, specialized needs, which have been identified through the advisement process. (3)
  
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    MUS 447 - Survey of Contemporary Popular Music Survey


    This course introduces a variety of styles to include Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Gospel, Rock, and standard popular and Country Western. Evaluation of performance in the various styles is a prime objective. Also emphasizes listening to selected recordings, aural analysis, and comparative discussions. (3)
  
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    MUS 451 - Studio Recording Techniques I


    Instruction in theoretical and practical experiences in techniques of sound production, and recording. Also provides instruction in use of multi-track recording equipment and allied hardware. Prerequisites: MUS 209  or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 452 - Studio Recording Techniques II


    Continues concepts and skills from MUS 451  and includes further development of traditional recording procedures, and computer applications. Prerequisites: MUS 451 . (3)
  
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    MUS 461 - Special Topics in Music


    Topics developed by the instructor for each offering of the course, which provides intensive study of a specific person, style, composition, issue, etc. See instructor for topic, as the topic may determine prerequisites. Prerequisites: MUS 345 , MUS 349 or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 462 - Special Topics in Music


    Topics developed by the instructor for each offering of the course, which provides intensive study of a specific person, style, composition, issue, etc. See instructor for topic, as the topic may determine prerequisites. Prerequisites: MUS 345 , MUS 349 or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 463 - Special Topics in Music


    Topics developed by the instructor for each offering of the course, which provides intensive study of a specific person, style, composition, issue, etc. See instructor for topic, as the topic may determine prerequisites. Prerequisites: MUS 345 , MUS 349 or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 464 - Special Topics in Music


    Topics developed by the instructor for each offering of the course, which provides intensive study of a specific person, style, composition, issue, etc. See instructor for topic, as the topic may determine prerequisites. Prerequisites: MUS 345 , MUS 349 or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 465 - Special Topics in Music


    Topics developed by the instructor for each offering of the course, which provides intensive study of a specific person, style, composition, issue, etc. See instructor for topic, as the topic may determine prerequisites. Prerequisites: MUS 345 , MUS 349 or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 466 - Special Topics in Music


    Topics developed by the instructor for each offering of the course, which provides intensive study of a specific person, style, composition, issue, etc. See instructor for topic, as the topic may determine prerequisites. Prerequisites: MUS 345 , MUS 349 or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 467 - Special Topics in Music


    Topics developed by the instructor for each offering of the course, which provides intensive study of a specific person, style, composition, issue, etc. See instructor for topic, as the topic may determine prerequisites. Prerequisites: MUS 345 , MUS 349 or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 468 - Special Topics in Music


    Topics developed by the instructor for each offering of the course, which provides intensive study of a specific person, style, composition, issue, etc. See instructor for topic, as the topic may determine prerequisites. Prerequisites: MUS 345 , MUS 349 or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 469 - Internship


    This course provides practical experiences in an appropriate professional arts environment. The student will manage responsibilities as determined by their needs, abilities, academic and career interests, as aligned with the opportunities offered by the cooperating organization/agency. Prerequisites: Senior standing and Administrative approval. (3)
  
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    MUS 479 - Senior Project


    The Senior Project represents the culmination of the student’s academic preparation. It requires the student to produce a significant research document. Approval to present the project to the public requires a majority vote of the faculty. The final public version of the research may take the form of a recital, concert of original compositions, or a lecture-presentation. Prerequisites: Senior standing, Faculty approval of subject. (3)
  
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    ORGD 415 - Group and Organizational Behavior


    This course is a study of group behavior and how group functioning affects organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on decision making and resolving conflict in groups. Adult learners develop strategies for efficient and productive group management and determine which tasks are handled by groups or individuals. (3)
  
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    ORGD 425 - Organizational Communication


    This course investigates communication and relationships in creating a productive work environment. Effectiveness in personal and social relationships is also covered through readings and exercises involving nonverbal communication, constructive feedback, dealing with anger, and resolving conflict. [Gateway Adult Learning Program]. (3)
  
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    ORGD 435 - Organizational Concepts


    Adult learners examine the formal and informal functions of organizations and analyze an agency or organization based on a systems model. Adult learners will also analyze and solve organizational problems using a step-by-step methodology. This analysis will be applied to adult learners’ work-related independent study projects. [Gateway Adult Learning Program]. (3)
  
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    ORGD 445 - Human Resource Administration


    Adult learners explore the values and perceptions of selected groups affecting social and economic life through an analysis of policies and practices of recruitment, selection, training, development and compensation of employees. Special attention is given to Equal Opportunity and Office of Safety and Health Administration legislation through a series of case studies and simulations. [Gateway Adult Learning Program]. (3)
  
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    ORGD 455 - Personal Values and Organizational Ethics


    Several major ethical theories are reviewed. Adult learners are asked to examine personal values through readings and workplace analysis to formulate a management philosophy incorporating business ethics, government accountability, human rights, and a responsible lifestyle in the contemporary world. [Gateway Adult Learning Program]. (3)
  
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    ORGD 465 - Action Research Project


    The Action Research project is a major research effort designed to enhance knowledge in an area related to one’s work or community and provide research skills to assist in effective decision-making. The adult learner completes a research project related to his/her employment environment. Statistical analysis concepts and methods assist the adult learner in identifying a topic, collecting data, and measuring results. A college facilitator monitors the progress of the independent study, and an on-site contact makes certain that the adult learner devotes at least 200 clock hours to the project. An oral report of project findings is given by each adult learner in this semester. [Gateway Adult Learning Program]. (5)
  
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    PE 101 - Wellness Concepts


    This course is geared towards helping the students to take charge of their life through an understanding of and introduction to wellness practices and personal development. A team teaching approach is used to provide knowledge and understanding of the various components of overall fitness and wellness, and to develop practices that will lay the foundation for students to develop a wellness attitude. A special session on AIDS and HIV will be covered. Instruction on how to identify and assess one’s own risk factors and develop solutions will be given.
  
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    PE 103 - Weight-Training


    This course deals with basic knowledge, techniques, and the practice of the fundamental skills of weight-training. Students are not permitted to enroll in the same course numbers and activities more than one (1) time in meeting their course requirements in the required Physical Activity program. (1)
  
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    PE 104 - Volleyball


    This course covers fundamental skills and knowledge of volleyball. Students are not permitted to enroll in the same course numbers and activities more than one (1) time in meeting their course requirements in the required Physical Activity program. (1)
  
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    PE 105 - Basketball


    This team sport activity deals with fundamental skills, techniques, knowledge and participation in basketball as a team sport. Students are not permitted to enroll in the same course numbers and activities more than one (1) time in meeting their course requirements in the required Physical Activity program. (1)
  
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    PE 107 - Badminton/Pickle Ball


    This course covers the fundamental skills and knowledge of the two sports. This course deals with participation and activity as an individual and team sport. Students are not permitted to enroll in the same course numbers and activities more than one (1) time in meeting their course requirements in the required Physical Activity program. (1)
  
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    PE 111 - Flag Football/Soccer


    This course covers the basic knowledge of the sports touch football and soccer. Students will have the opportunity to play the sports. Students are not permitted to enroll in the same course numbers and activities more than one (1) time in meeting their course requirements in the required Physical Activity program. (1)
  
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    PE 113 - Tennis


    This course covers the fundamental skills and knowledge of tennis. Students are not permitted to enroll in the same course numbers and activities more than one (1) time in meeting their course requirements in the required Physical Activity program. (1)
  
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    PE 114 - Recreational Activities


    This course includes an analysis of the basic knowledge, techniques, fundamentals skills, and individual participation in class chosen activities. This class is geared to the needs and interest of the student and promotes lifetime fitness activities/skills. Students are not permitted to enroll in the same course numbers and activities more than one (1) time in meeting their course requirements in the required Physical Activity program. (1)
  
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    PE 115 - Social Dance


    This course offers knowledge of rhythms basic to the development of performance, ability, and skill in the execution of natural activities. Students are not permitted to enroll in the same course numbers and activities more than one (1) time in meeting their course requirements in the required Physical Activity program. (1)
  
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    PE 116 - Aerobics/Fitness


    This course is designed for students interested in the development of cardiovascular endurance and muscle tone. Students are not permitted to enroll in the same course numbers and activities more than one (1) time in meeting their course requirements in the required Physical Activity program. (1)
  
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    PE 120 - Total Wellness


    This course is designed to provide students with an overview of individual, interpersonal, and socio-cultural issues that have an impact on health. Emphasis is placed on behavioral decision making, social relations, cultural diversity and environmental sensitivity. Special consideration is placed on assisting students to become consumers of good health. Students will attain health related knowledge and apply the information to decision making that is related to physical, social, emotional, spiritual, intellectual, occupational and environmental well-being. Lifestyle choices are identified regarding proper exercise, weight management, stress management, substance use, sexually transmitted disease prevention, and cancer protection. (3)
  
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    PE 121 - Sat: Individual and Dual Sports


    The development of skills and techniques in individual and dual activities and life-time fitness is stressed. Emphasis is placed on individual activities. (3)
  
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    PE 122 - Sat: Team Sports


    The development of skills and techniques in team activities and life-time fitness is stressed. (2)
  
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    PE 123 - Personal Health


    This course provides the student with a thorough foundation in health facts, both personal and community, upon which he/she can build sound principles of instruction. A special session on AIDS and HIV will be covered in this course. (2)
  
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    PE 205 - Parallel Internship I


    This twenty (20) hour per week work-study plan is designed to integrate academic experiences with practical experiences on the job. Students usually work on discipline-related jobs and return to their employers for successive terms. (3)
  
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    PE 206 - Parallel Internship II


    A twenty (20) hour per week work-study plan is designed to integrate academic experiences with practical experiences on the job. Students usually work on discipline-related jobs and return to their employers for successive terms. (3)
  
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    PE 221 - First Aid, Safety, Prevention and Treatment of Athletic Injuries


    This lecture laboratory course is designed to equip the student with knowledge and skills necessary to provide immediate care to the injured or suddenly ill person. The student may earn a certification in Standard First Aid and CPR. (2)
  
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    PE 224 - Athletic Training


    This course is designed to introduce the field of athletic training and its practical and theoretical applications. It includes a lab and will introduce students to NATA requirements and other organizations with which the athletic trainer must be familiar. (3)
  
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    PE 225 - Athletic Training I


    This course is designed to introduce the field of athletic training and its administrative problems, types of scientific knowledge necessary for instituting a program of injury prevention, and various treatment techniques with which the trainer must be familiar. Prerequisites: PE 221 . (2)
  
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    PE 226 - Athletic Training II


    This course is designed for injury prevention and basic foundations of sports training. Prerequisites: PE 225 . (2) T1 SL
  
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    PE 231 - Introduction to Health, Physical Education and Recreation


    Orientation to the Health, Physical Education and Recreation professions in regard to history, objectives, relationships, professional organization and the importance of the field in American life. (3)
  
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    PE 234 - Principles of Health, Physical Education and Recreation


    This course covers the history and foundations of the science of Health, Physical Education and Recreation from the professional viewpoint. It stresses aspects of anatomy, physiology, sociology, and psychology. (3)
  
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    PE 241 - Human Anatomy and Physiology


    A lecture course designed to teach fundamentals of anatomy and physiology as they apply to the human body, with reference to Health Physical Education and Recreation. (3)
  
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    PE 241L - Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab


    A laboratory course designed to re-enforce theoretical concepts of Human Anatomy and Physiology. (1)
  
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    PE 250 - Introduction to Public Health


    This is an introductory course to the field of Public Health. The course emphasizes the duties and responsibilities of professionals, foundations, terminology and diverse work environments. (3)
  
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    PE 313 - Education for Leisure and Camping


    This course deals with preparing students to conduct lifetime outdoor sports and camp activities. (2)
  
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    PE 321 - Introduction to Recreation and Outdoor Education


    This course introduces the student to the basic factors involved in recreation and leisure time activities. Attention is focused upon the role played by the recreation leader in promoting leisure time. (2)
  
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    PE 322 - Principles and Practices of Outdoor Recreation


    A course designed to meet the needs of students who work in the area of outdoor activities of a recreational nature. (2)
  
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    PE 323 - Community Recreation


    This course is designed to meet the needs of those students who will work outside the school and devote their energies to recreational work in the community. It stresses the knowledge of the development, structure, purpose, functions and interrelations of private, public, voluntary, military, and commercial agencies, which render recreation services. (2)
  
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    PE 326 - Introduction to Sport Information


    This course is designed to acquaint Sport Information majors with the field of sport information. Marketing, Sports Writing, Statistical Management, Score Reporting, Play-By-Play, Press Releases, and Sports Promoting are included as areas of emphasis. Guest speakers and Field activities (scorekeeping, interviews, and sports writing) are among the learning experiences students will acquire throughout the course. (3)
  
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    PE 329 - Special Topics in HIV/Aids


    This course will provide an informative environment where students will be able to examine special topics in HIV and AIDS. A learning environment will be provided that will encourage research, data analysis, information sharing, and understandings of the prevention of HIV/AIDS, strategies for teaching prevention to various populations, treatment and care options, availability, access, and cultural relevance. (3)
  
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    PE 330 - School Health Education


    Study of the modern school Health Education Programs, their organizational methods and materials of instruction. Special attention is given to the health status of the school child and his or her problems. A special session on AIDS and HIV will be covered in this course. (2)
  
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    PE 331 - Athletic Coaching and Officiating I


    This course is offered for majors to gain experience in coaching and officiating fall sports. (3)
  
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    PE 332 - Athletic Coaching and Officiating II


    This course is offered for majors to gain experience in coaching and officiating spring sports. (2)
  
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    PE 333 - Kinesiology


    This course includes a study of muscular action and the mechanics of body movements involved in a variety of actions and of selected physical activities with analysis of the effect of muscular and gravitational forces. (3)
  
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    PE 334 - Social and Community Health


    This course is designed to study the social aspects of the problems of the health and physical well-being of the individual and community. Much interest and attention are given to community health problems and some effective ways and means of implementing health services, health counseling, screening and care of emergency illnesses within the school, community and home. (2)
  
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    PE 335 - Adaptive Physical Education


    This course deals with the causes of various common physical handicaps, and the fundamental principles in the selection and adaptation of activities given in corrective procedures. (3)
  
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    PE 336 - Organization and Administration of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation


    This course is designed to meet the needs of students who will plan, direct, supervise, and construct Health, Physical Education and Recreation Programs. (3)
  
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    PE 338 - Exercise Physiology


    This class will cover physiological responses/adaptations to exercise. Topics in this course include: neuromuscular, metabolic, cardiovascular, hormonal, and respiratory systems as they pertain to acute and chronic exercise. (3)
  
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    PE 421 - Practices and Procedures in Health


    This course deals with the current practices in Health Education for elementary (K-6) students and gives a survey of the materials available for teaching health to children at the elementary level. The North Carolina Standard Course of Study is used to guide this course. (3)
  
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    PE 422 - Practices and Procedures in Physical Education for Elementary Schools


    For those concerned with Physical Education at the elementary (K-6) grade levels. Physical Fitness, games, motor skills, and movement patterns. The North Carolina Standard Course of Study is used to guide this course. (3)
  
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    PE 432 - Tests and Measurements in Physical Education


    This course is designed to acquaint students with tests and measurements in the field of Physical Education, statistical analysis, test construction and scoring. Open to juniors and seniors. (3)
  
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    PE 433 - Dance


    This course offers knowledge of rhythms basic to the development of performance, ability and skill in the execution of natural activities. The course deals with the fundamental skills suitable for prospective teachers as well as skill development for those who like to dance. Dance of many countries as related to the customs, mores and traditions will be identified. (2)
  
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    PE 463 - Human Performance and Wellness Internship


    Supervised internship in a professional work environment that will provide the student with exposure to the job market in health, physical education and recreation agencies. Students will be responsible for completing 480 clock hours of work and be required to present detailed descriptions of work activities and experience. Prerequisites: All required coursework in the HPW major. (12)
  
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    PHIL 100 - Critical Thinking


    This course focuses on developing skills in logical reasoning, analysis and evaluation. Critical thinking is the number one ability sought after by employers across the board, and the number expectation of an undergraduate education. This class gives the students the tools, terminology, and techniques to develop their own reasoning abilities to think critically and skeptically about issues in any field. (3)
  
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    PHIL 231 - Introduction to Philosophy


    An examination of basic concepts and principles of philosophy with emphasis on developing the students’ ability to analyze philosophical theory and consider the possibilities of personal application. The course will focus on representative thinkers from classical to modern philosophers. (3)
  
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    PHIL 235 - Ethics


    A study of the various theories concerning the nature of morality. Contemporary ethical issues will be investigated in depth. The students will be challenged to consider the application of ethical concepts to their individual and professional lives. Prerequisites: ENGL 132 . (3)
  
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    PHIL 375 - Special Topics in Philosophy


    This course introduces students to a particular philosophical topic in some detail. This seminar style class encourages students to apply critical reasoning to a topic of contemporary interest: for example, Terrorism, Race, Just War; of specific philosophical interest: African American Philosophy, Epistemology, Philosophy of Religion; or focusing on the work of a notable philosopher, Immanuel Kant, Plato, Aristotle, etc. Topics vary semester to semester. Honors credit is available for any special topic with permission of the instructor. (3)
  
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    PHS 200 - Public Health 101


    An introduction to public health concepts and practice by examining principles of public health, tools of population health, and an examination of the effects of disease, disability, and death on public health. In addition, health care professionals, institutions, systems and other public health institutions and systems will be discussed. The various components of the course aim to stimulate interactions among and between learners and instructors around important problems and issues facing public health. This course targets front line public health workers who have not previously had any formal education and preparation for public health practice. (3)
  
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    PHS 210 - Public Health Nutrition


    Covers the interaction of nutrients and human body functions (cell biology and physiology) and the relationship of diet to health and disease. An introduction to the principles of physiological metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids & proteins are emphasized. It also examines the principles of public health nutrition and explores the nutrition issues of individuals throughout the lifecycle. Prerequisites: PHS 200   MATH 131 , BIOL 133 , CHEM 141 , CHEM 142 . (3)
  
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    PHS 310 - Essentials of Public Health Biology


    Explores the pathogenesis of various disease conditions and explains how to identify critical points at which such pathogenesis could either be prevented or interrupted. Infectious, nutritional, metabolic, genetic, and environmental risks and the impact of these risks on various organ systems are thoroughly examined. Prerequisite: PHS 210 . (3)
  
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    PHS 320 - Public Health Microbiology


    A survey of bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites that cause infectious disease. Subjects include host symptoms, isolation and identification of microorganisms and mechanisms of pathogenesis. Prerequisite: PHS 310 . (3)
  
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    PHS 320L - Public Health Microbiology Laboratory


    Introduces the students to detection methods used for community infectious diseases caused by microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites). The laboratory session will also provide the students with hands on experiment on how to isolate and identify the microorganisms. Prerequisite: PHS 310 . (1)
  
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    PHS 330 - Essentials of Health Behavior


    Designed to help students develop basic literacy regarding social concepts and processes that influence health status and public health interventions. The course also hopes to help students develop insight into populations with whom they have worked in the past or will work in the future, and to develop one kind of effective writing tool (the narrative) for communicating about psychosocial issues in public health. These overall aims are approached through lectures, discussion, readings, workshops, individual compositions, and group discussion of student writings. Prerequisite: PHS 310 . (3)
  
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    PHS 340 - Epidemiology & Biostatistics


    Involves the study of the occurrence of disease and seeks to assess factors relating to the individual, his environment and lifestyle with the aim of establishing the causes of disease. Epidemiological data are evaluated using biostatistical techniques. This evaluation seeks to address accuracy, precision, systematic error, influences of other factors as well as the interaction of risk factors on the validity of the epidemiological study. Prerequisite: MATH 131 , PHS 200  . (4)
  
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    PHS 350 - Health Disparities in America: Policy Implications


    Health disparities are differences in the burden of disease felt by particular communities of people, as defined by racial/ethnic, socioeconomic and other demographic characteristics. This course will explore the contribution to these disparities from social factors such as limitations in access to medical care or other social resources as well as from human perceptions and other daily stressors. Although little is known about which policies work best to reverse the impact of disparities on health, this course will engage in active debate and consideration of proposals. Cross-listed as PPS 350 . Prerequisites: PHS 200  , PHS 330 . (3)
  
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    PHS 400 - Global Health


    Course explores health and disease in global terms, considering the many overlapping issues associated with variations in the health and disease of individuals and communities ranging from poverty in the developing world to the most affluent areas of the industrialized societies, but with a special focus on the most vulnerable (poor, rural, migrants, refugees, minorities, and so on). It traverses such issues as how historical and cross-cultural perspectives help us understand and address contemporary disease, the causes and consequences of the massive health inequities we observe in the world today, and how global processes play out on the ground in local terms with real communities. Prerequisite: PHS 310 , PSYCH 132 , SOC 233 , PPS 350 . (3)
  
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    PHS 410 - OSHA for Bloodborne Pathogens


    Addresses the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens standard as it applies to clinical and medical laboratories. It covers topics on major bloodborne pathogens, including Hepatitis B and HIV and many more. The majority of this course focuses on safety, including proper handling of sharps, personal protective equipment (PPE), use of engineering controls such as microbiological safety cabinets, and proper work practices including hand washing. This course will require rotations through an affiliated site and an online training course. Prerequisite: PHS 200  , PHS 320 . (2)
  
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    PHS 420 - Public Health Internship


    This course is designed to give students skills information and an opportunity to interact with a public health professional prior to internship.  The students will “shadow” a professionally prepared public health professional for at least 10 hours during the semester.  The public health professional will function in a mentoring capacity.  Students will be given the opportunities to enhance interviewing, written communication and presentation skills.  In addition, this course will allow students to conduct a needs assessment around a specific health problem and target population.  Students will make an oral presentation based on their shadowing experience.  The course will be delivered in   seminar format addressing professional preparation in health education and planning for the 180-hour supervised internship experience (PHS 421).   Prerequisites:  PHS 210  , PHS 310  , PHS 320 , PHS 350   or with the permission of instructor. (3)
  
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    PHS 421 - Public Health Internship


    PHS 420 - Public Health Internship  provides the students an opportunity to apply public health skills in community settings. The internship serves as the culminating experience for the program. The public health internships are carefully planned, highly supervised and critically evaluated. Experiences are selected that reflect the mission of the Community Public Health Program and meet the individual learning and career needs of students while responding to real community public health issues as articulated by the internship sites. Preferred internship projects are those that provide opportunities for students to continue the teaching-learning process, service and research activities. During the internship, students are able to gain greater understanding of their responsibilities and enhance their level of competence as public health professionals. Students are to choose a project that allows them to demonstrate competence in public health skills such Analytic/Assessment Skills, Policy Development/Program, Planning Skills, Communication Skills, Cultural Competency Skills, Community Dimensions of Practice Skills, Basic Public Health Sciences Skills, Financial Planning and Management Skills and Leadership and Systems Thinking Skills. Prerequisites: Permission from the advisor and the department head. (6)
  
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    PHS 430 - Public Health Toxicology


    Introduces the student to the science of poisons - in this case, how chemicals that have been inhaled, ingested, absorbed, or injected into the body affect cells, tissue, and organs, and how the body acts to detoxify and excrete those chemicals. Particular attention will be paid to the concepts of dose-response including the absorption, distribution, and elimination of toxic chemicals, especially the toxicological response of the blood-forming organs, liver, nerve cells, kidneys, skin, and lungs. Students will be introduced to risk assessment of toxic chemicals. This course will also familiarize the students with the laboratory techniques used in a public health toxicology laboratory. Prerequisites: PHS 320 , PHS 340 . (4)
  
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    PHS 440 - Public Health Ethics


    This course will allow students the opportunity to investigate and debate critical issues of the current era. This is a student-led and guest speaker oriented seminar that will require active and full participation in each of the sessions. Prerequisites: PHS 320 , PHS 330 , PHS 340 . (3)
  
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    PHS 450 - Epidemiology & Biostatistics


    This course involves the study of the occurrence of disease and seeks to assess factors related to the individual, his environment and lifestyle with the aim of establishing the causes of disease. Epidemiological data are evaluated using biostatisical techniques. This evaluation seeks to address accuracy, precision, systematic error, influences of other factors as well as the interaction of risk factors on the validity of the epidemiological study. (4)
  
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    PHYS 131 - Fundamentals of Physical Science


    Principles and topics are selected from the fields of chemistry, geology, physics, astronomy, and meteorology. Subject matter includes such topics as our solar system, energy relationships in our universe, the changing earth, atoms, molecules, chemical reactions, causes and effects of weather changes, etc. Emphasis is on problem solving. (3) T1 SCL
  
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    PHYS 131L - Fundamentals of Physical Science Laboratory


    Laboratory experiments designed to acquaint students with basic measurements and analysis of concepts related to topics covered in CHEM 131. Must be concurrently registered in or have successfully completed CHEM 131. Fee required. (2 hours per week) (1)
  
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    PHYS 241 - General College Physics I


    This is the first course of a two semester introductory non- calculus physics sequence. Topics include mechanics, heat and wave motion. Prerequisites: MATH 133 . (3)
  
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    PHYS 241L - General College Physics I Laboratory


    This laboratory will cover experiments from mechanics, heat and wave motion. Prerequisites: MATH 133 . Fee required. (1)
  
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    PHYS 242 - General College Physics II


    This is the second semester course in non-calculus physics. Topics include sound, electricity and light. Prerequisites: PHYS 241 . (3)
  
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    PHYS 242L - General College Physics II Laboratory


    This laboratory will cover experiments from sound, electricity and light. Prerequisites: PHYS 241L . Fee required. (3)
  
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    PHYS 243 - General Physics I


    First calculus based course of a three semester sequence employing the analytical approach in the study of classical and modern physics. Mechanics, heat and sound are covered. Prerequisites: MATH 231 . (3)
  
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    PHYS 243L - General Physics I Laboratory


    This laboratory will cover experiments from mechanics, heat and sound. Prerequisites: MATH 231 . Fee required. (1)
  
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    PHYS 244 - General Physics II


    Second course of a three semester calculus-based sequence. Topics on Light, electricity, magnetism and some aspects of modern physics are covered. Prerequisites: PHYS 243 . (3)
  
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    PHYS 244L - General Physics II Laboratory


    This laboratory will include experiments from light, electricity and magnetism. Prerequisites: PHYS 243L . Fee required. (1)
  
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    PHYS 245 - General Physics III


    Calculus-based sequence involving the study of the principles of wave optics and modern physics are treated in detail. Prerequisites: PHYS 244 . (3)
  
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    POLS 100 - Introduction to Political Science


    Introduction to basic theories, methods, and concepts of political science, with emphasis on the role of ideology and interests in the political process. (3)
  
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    POLS 110 - Introduction to Black Politics


    This introductory course provides an overview of African American politics, while carefully defining each area of study in the discipline. The course will focus on relevant literature as well as provide a framework of case studies or topical approaches to the presentation of literature. (3)
  
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    POLS 137 - Introduction to International Affairs


    This course is designed to introduce the field of international affairs to students. Assuming that the class attendants have no prior knowledge on the subject, Introduction to International Affairs covers diverse topics from globalization to terrorism. Students are expected to analyze a given international affair. (3)
  
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    POLS 210 - American National Government


    Introduction to American federal government from both domestic and international perspectives. Special emphasis on the implications and responsibilities of political and economic leadership. (3)
  
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    POLS 220 - Political Ideologies


    Introduction to basic contemporary political ideologies, including theoretical foundations of democracy, socialism, communism, and nationalism. (3)
 

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