Aug 20, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


TEP Acronyms

AL - Artistic Literacy IC - Innovation & Creativity SL - Servant Leadership
AW - Advanced Writing ID - Identity TECH - Computer Technology
CAP -  Capstone OC - Oral Communication TW - Teamwork
CT -  Critical Thinking QL - Math WC - Written Communication
FL - Foreign Language/Sign Language SCL - Science with Lab WEL - Wellness
GP - Global Perspective    

 

 
  
  •  

    FLFR 336 - Black Writers in French


    A study of major authors from the Caribbean and Africa. (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 338 - French Literature of the 19th Century


    A study of representative Romantic authors to 1850 and selected poetry, novels and plays to the 1900s. (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 339 - French Literature of the 19th Century


    A study of representative Romantic authors to 1850 and selected poetry, novels and plays to the 1900s. (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 401 - French Literature of the 20th Century


    Selected readings from writers of the 20th century. (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 431 - Senior Seminar


    Advanced readings and written reports. Selection of a topic for investigation in one of the following fields: literature, linguistics, French history, French institutions, French philosophy, and Black French writers. (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 432 - Senior Seminar


    Advanced readings and written reports. Selection of a topic for investigation in one of the following fields: literature, linguistics, French history, French institutions, French philosophy, and Black French writers. (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 131 - Elementary Spanish I


    Introduction to the spoken and written language. Knowledge of basic speech patterns supplemented with a broad study of the culture and civilization of Spanish speaking countries. (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 132 - Elementary Spanish II


    Continued emphasis on the spoken and written language. Knowledge of basic speech patterns supplemented with a broad study of the culture and civilization of Spanish speaking countries. Prerequisites: FLSP 131  or proficiency test. (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 231 - Intermediate Spanish I


    Continuation of the study of the language through reading, writing and conversation with emphasis on grammar. Prerequisites: FLSP 132   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 232 - Intermediate Spanish II


    Part II of Intermediate Spanish. Continuation of the study of the language through reading, writing, and conversation with emphasis on grammar. Prerequisites: FLSP 231   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 233 - Business Communication I


    Readings and discussion of contemporary business practices. Development of business vocabulary, writing, and cross-cultural skills. Prerequisites: FLSP 232   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 234 - Business Communication II


    Part II of Business Communication. Readings and discussion of contemporary business practices. Development of business vocabulary, writing, and cross-cultural skills. Prerequisites: FLSP 233   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 235 - Spanish Conversation I


    Oral and written practice of the language. Prerequisites: FLSP 132   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 236 - Spanish Conversation II


    Oral and written practice of the language. Prerequisites: FLSP 235   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 331 - Survey of Spanish Literature


    Readings and discussions of works from the Medieval and Renaissance Literature to Don Quixote. Readings will be in English and Spanish. Prerequisites: FLSP 232   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 332 - Survey of Spanish Literature


    Readings and discussions of works from the Golden Age and Modern Peninsular Literature. Readings will be in English and Spanish. Prerequisites: FLSP 232   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 333 - Literature of 12th-14th Centuries


    A study of works from the 12th-14th centuries. Prerequisites: FLSP 232   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 334 - Literature of the 15th and 16th Centuries


    A study of the Spanish literature in the 15th and 16th centuries, including poetry, drama, and prose. Prerequisites: FLSP 232   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 335 - Literature of the 17th and 18th Centuries


    A study of the Spanish literature in the 17th and 18th centuries, including poetry, drama, and prose. Prerequisites: FLSP 232   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 336 - Latin American Literature


    A study of major authors from the areas of poetry, drama, and prose. Latin America from Independence to the 20th Century. Prerequisites: FLSP 232   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 338 - Spanish American Literature


    An intense study of Spanish American Literature from Discovery to Independence of Latin American countries. Prerequisites: FLSP 232   (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 401 - Latin American Literature, the Contemporary Period


    Selected readings from areas of poetry, drama and prose in the contemporary period of Latin American Literature.
  
  •  

    FLSP 431 - Senior Seminar


    Advanced readings and written reports. An in-depth study of a specific literary genre, author, or period. (3)
  
  •  

    FLSP 432 - Senior Seminar


    Advanced readings and written reports. An in-depth study of a specific literary genre, author, or period. (3)
  
  •  

    FS 201 - Introduction to Forensic Science


    This course provides fundamentals of criminal investigation, scientific aids, case preparation and management, familiarization with specific instrumentation in crime detection and evidence selection for evidential value. Also, this course will offer a general overview, focused understanding, and appreciation of the wide scope of the forensic science disciplines. Prerequisites: BIOL 134  and CHEM 142 . (3)
  
  •  

    FS 340 - Crime Scene Investigation


    From a law enforcement perspective, this course addresses crime scene concerns, including search, collection, recording and preservation of physical evidence, recognition of bloodstain patterns, laws of evidence controlling investigative procedures, sources of information (e.g. interview and interrogation). Training in expert testimony, forensic photography, and trace evidence in a laboratory setting. Experts in these fields will be called in to conduct special lectures. Prerequisite: FS 201 . (3)
  
  •  

    FS 380 - Forensic Serology


    Lecture and laboratory overview of the field of serology with an emphasis on forensic application. Traditional biotechnology and immunological techniques used for the identification and blood grouping of fluids and dried stains will be emphasized by lecture and lab. The student will learn to apply the most appropriate technique to specific serological circumstances. Pre-requisite: BIOL 310 . (3)
  
  •  

    FS 380L - Forensic Serology Lab


    A laboratory course designed to investigate and determine the various types of body fluid. Students will identify and analyze the characteristics of blood, blood testing, bloodstain examination. Students will also identify and determine semen, saliva and other body fluids. Prerequisites: BIOL 310L . (1)
  
  •  

    FS 445 - Forensic Evidence and Law


    The course will introduce students into the role of forensic evidence in litigation. This course will teach students the skills of listening, speaking and writing effectively for litigation. This course focuses on the civil and criminal cases that went before the United States Supreme Court, and shaped the Federal Rules of Evidence. There will be presentation of scientific expert testimony in court, progression of admissibility standards of evidence and expert testimony, and specific cases that have made particular arenas of forensic science valid through verdicts in federal court. Prerequisite: ENGL 132 , CJ 101 , and FS 201 . (3)
  
  •  

    FS 446 - Ethics in Forensic Science


    This course will address the issues surrounding and expert witness, as well as discussing specifically what is expected of a forensic scientist expert witness in civil and criminal litigation. Professional issues that could result in personal embarrassment, professional organizational disciplinary action, or even formal legal charges will be discussed in relation to expert-attorney and expert-client relationships. Students will be challenges to consider the application of ethical concepts in forensic science. Prerequisites: CJ 101  and FS 445 . (3)
  
  •  

    FS 447 - Forensic Science Research/ Internship


    This course requires identification, formulation and solution of meaningful scientific problems encountered in forensic science including experimental design and/or theoretical analysis of new and prevailing techniques, theories and hypotheses. Students will present their research. A principal advisor will guide students in shaping their research plan. Students also have the option of a field internship that allows them to integrate theory with hands on experience through independent laboratory work and study at an affiliated crime laboratory. The internship must be performed in an approved agency under the supervision of a faculty member. The student will spend 1-3 week rotations in the major areas of the crime laboratory, such as instrumental analysis, toxicology/drug analysis, DNA analysis, and trace analysis. Prerequisite: FS 446 FS 445 FS 380 . (3)
  
  •  

    FS 452 - Forensic Evidence and Law


    Forensic Evidence and Law explores the role of forensic science in criminal justice. The course will introduce students to four major principles of physical evidence in criminal, civil, and family law: generation of physical evidence by criminal activity; collection and preservation of physical evidence; analysis of physical evidence by forensic science laboratory; presentation scientific expert testimony in court. Prerequisite: FS 340 . (3)
  
  •  

    FS 455 - Forensic Microscopy


    This course is designed to introduce students to the various more common microscopy instrumentation found in crime laboratories. The course will prepare students to select and utilize appropriate equipment and techniques to make basic observations of the physical and optical properties of common evidential materials. Prerequisite: FS 446 , BIOL 310  and BIOL 332  . (3)
  
  •  

    FS 457 - Forensics DNA Profiling


    This course provides theory on the science of DNA. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA analysis of blood, semen, saliva, and other biological organisms and detection methods. Prerequisites: FS 380  and BIOL 442 . (3)
  
  •  

    FS 457L - Forensic DNA Profiling Laboratory


    This course provides the laboratory applications of DNA isolation of (nuclear and mitochondrial DNA analysis of blood, semen, saliva, and other biological organisms). Techniques covered will include Polymerase Chain Reaction, isolation of genomic DNA, RFLP analysis, DNA electrophoresis. Prerequisites: FS 380L  and BIOL 442L . (1)
  
  •  

    FYE 101 - Global and Critical Inquiry in the First Year 1


    Global and Critical Inquiry in the First Year will combine first year transitional skills with critical thought, inquiry, and research regarding global learning. The course is presented in two modules that span the academic year to better promote awareness and access to international perspectives. These courses replace GED 112 Freshman Studies. (2)
  
  •  

    FYE 102 - Global and Critical Inquiry in the First Year 2


    Global and Critical Inquiry in the First Year will combine first year transitional skills with critical thought, inquiry, and research regarding global learning. The course is presented in two modules that span the academic year to better promote awareness and access to international perspectives. These courses replace GED 112 Freshman Studies. (2)
  
  •  

    GEO 331 - Principles of Geography


    An introduction to the earth as an interrelationship of physical systems. Emphasis will be given to the vocabulary of geography, special perceptions, and map analysis and interpretation. (3)
  
  •  

    GEO 332 - Regional Geography:


    A study of the major geographical realms and regions of the world in accordance with various criteria, including physiography, culture, economics, politics and religion. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 133 - World Civilization I


    A general survey of the emergence of civilizations on all continents and the contributions of diverse peoples to the development of various cultures. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 134 - World Civilization II


    A general survey of the growth and changes in various civilizations on all continents and the role and causes that increasing contact between traditionally isolated peoples played in the development of the modern world. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 222 - Introduction to Africana Studies


    Examines the principle features of people in the African Diaspora through examination of geopolitical context; historical themes; and, selected social, political, economic, religious, and aesthetic characteristics of both traditional and modern Africa as well as the Diaspora. It is also a multicultural focus on contemporary societies that include black people and the methodology, key issues and themes in Africana Studies. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 223 - African Diaspora in the Americas


    Explores the political, economic and social experiences of people of African descent in North America, Central America, South America, and Latin America. It is an interdisciplinary survey of African descendant communities and the development and expression of African/Black identities in the context of competing definitions of “Diaspora”. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 224 - African American History I


    A survey of the African American experience in and contributions to American history from the advent of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade through the Civil War. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 225 - African American History II


    A survey of the African American experience in and contributions to the United States since the end of the Civil War. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 231 - American History I


    A survey of the contributions of Native American, European, and African people to the emergence of an American nation and culture from prehistory through Reconstruction era. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 232 - American History II


    A survey of the developments that have had the greatest influence on the American experience since the end of the Reconstruction era. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 233 - A Survey of European History From 1500 to 1879


    A study of the historical forces that shaped the development of European history between the Renaissance Movement and the French Revolution. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 234 - A Survey of European History From 1879 to the Present


    A study of the historical forces that shaped the development of modern Europe and Europe’s impact on the world. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 235 - A Survey of African Culture and Civilization I


    A general history of the accomplishments of African peoples from the origins of man until 1500 C.E. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 237 - Invasion, Conquest and Expansion: Growth of the US


    Examines the years from the initial European contact in the late 15th century, the subsequent invasion of the mainland of North America, and all territorial acquisitions since. Analyzes the conflict between the ideals of the republic and America as an empire and the imperial plans that fell through. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 238 - History of Ethnicity and Race in the US


    Examines the United States as a nation of nations and the tension between the process of Americanization on one hand and retention of ethnic and racial identity on the other. Emphasis is on the various periods of immigration, both coerced and voluntary, as well as the conflict between nativist exclusionary policies and open door inclusive policies. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 239 - Conflict and Consensus: History of Political Parties in America


    Examines the development of political parties in American history. It explores the origins of political parties despite the Founding Fathers’ deep distrust of them, the emergence and persistence of a two-party system, and the rise and fall of third parties. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 240 - Jefferson and Hamilton: Two Directions for America


    Examines the differences between Thomas Jefferson’s vision of America as a nation of rural “sturdy yeomen” working the land under a republican form of government versus the vision of Alexander Hamilton, which emphasized commerce, industry, and implicit economic imperialism. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 241 - Women in American History


    Examines women’s roles and contributions from the colonial period to the present. Themes include the family and sexuality, reform movements, the impact of industrialization, and difference of race, class, and region. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 242 - African American Women’s History


    Examines the history of black women in the United States from the 17th century to the present. It addresses such themes as work, family, community, sexuality, politics, religion and culture. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 243 - Women in the South


    Explores the distinctive themes in southern women’s lives. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 244 - History of Women and Politics


    Examines the history of gender bias in politics of violence against women, including sexual assault, domestic violence, and stalking. It includes executive, legislative, and legal responses to violence against women, as well as current programs and methods to fight sexual assault and domestic violence. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 245 - Women, Race, and Class


    A class and gender analysis of the experiences of women in the Americas between the 15th and 20th centuries. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 246 - the Age of Jim Crow


    An intensive analysis of American segregation from the late 19th century to the 1970s. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 247 - Blacks in Europe


    Examines the role of people of African descent in Europe. A major focus of this course is the political, economic, religious, educational and cultural experiences of Africans in Europe from the 17th century to the present. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 248 - Women in Antebellum America


    Examines women’s experiences between 1820 to 1860. Women from the different regions of the country are the focus of this course. Their roles and contributions to society are compared. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 249 - Introduction to Pan Africanism


    Examines the development of African awareness within the advancement of racial uplift. Key figures and radical movements that promoted African awareness through social justice will be identified and studied. This course will also look at contemporary scholars who look at the symbolic link between Africa and African Americans through academic research. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 250 - Reform and Reaction: Progress in the United States


    Examines specific reform movements in America, focusing exclusively on the temperance movement, eugenics movement, and the anti-war movement. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 251 - Hang ‘Em High or Rehabilitate: Crime and Punishment in America


    Examines the various white- and blue-collar crimes in America and how punishment was politicized. It is also a class and race analysis of crime and punishment in America. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 260 - Language in the Caribbean


    A survey of the major periods, texts, and issues in the language of the Caribbean. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 262 - Introduction to Swahili


    Examines the essential elements of Swahili structure and vocabulary and aspects of African cultures. Aural comprehension, reading, speaking, and writing are stresses. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 270 - African Economic Development


    Examines the economic theories, planning, production, and resource allocation strategies, capital formation, foreign aid, and multinational corporations in Africa. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 300 - Prudes and Pornographers: Piety and Sin in America


    Focuses on Christian conservative thinking and how it shaped America’s sense of self from Puritan America to the present. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 320 - Militarism and Pacifism: Different Views On War in America


    Examines the conflict between the ideal of peace and the reality of war in American history. Examines selected wars the U.S. has fought, the reasons behind political pressure to go to war or refrain from it. It also addresses peace movements, war resisters, and the effects of these groups. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 328 - Contemporary Topics in African American History


    Intensive analysis of selected topics related to the African-American experience. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 330 - African American Freedom Movements in the United States


    Examines the struggle by African Americans for social justice from the antebellum period to the present as well as the systemic responses. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 332 - African American Culture


    Examines the aesthetic dimensions of African-American culture through the examination of aspects of literature, music, drama, art, and dance. Explores black culture as manifested in social, political, economic, and religious institutions through directed fieldwork, lectures and research. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 333 - North Carolina History


    A study of the key events and developments that have shaped the history of the state. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 345 - Faith and Evidence: Reform and Science in America


    Examines the age-old question: What is the origin of humankind-evolution or Adam and Eve? Explores various debates about the evolution of man and allows students to contribute to the discourse by providing their own theories based on their research findings. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 352 - Women in World History


    Examines the roles of women in societies all over the world from prehistoric times to the present. It also compares and contrasts differences in women’s experiences. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 355 - History of African Women


    Examines the experiences of women in different African countries, highlighting differences and similarities. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 356 - Feminist Theory


    Examines the methodological basis for theoretical approaches to Women Studies and focuses on critical issues in the study of women’s experiences. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 362 - Women in Music, Film, Politics and Business


    Examines the experiences of American women in music, film, politics, and business, focusing on how the experiences have changed over time. Explores also the role race, class and gender play in the opportunities for women in these traditionally male fields. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 401 - Fringe Groups: Minorities, Social Movements and Third Parties in America


    Examines the role of social movements and third political parties in the United States. It includes the causes and effects of movements such as abolition, suffrage, temperance, civil rights, and others. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 405 - Farm and City Life in America


    This course takes a comparative look at the social, economic, racial and labor components of American life in urban metropolises and rural communities. The historical impact of education, war and tensions will be examined to fully understand the demographic diversity of life in America. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 410 - Introduction to Public History


    A survey of non-academic careers available to history majors including historic preservation, archival management, museum, historical archaeology, historical publications, and historic site programs. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 412 - Visible or Invisible: the History of the American Economy


    Traces the historical development of America’s economy from the colonial period to the present. Various economic institutions are compared and an assessment of the free market economy-its advantages and disadvantages-is made. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 420 - Research Methodology in Women’s History


    Explores the philosophies, methods and theories entailed in doing scholarly work in women’s and gender studies. The final project is a research paper. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 430 - Women of the Black Diaspora


    Examines the history of black women in diverse societies. Themes include work, family, community, sexuality, politics, religion and culture. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 432 - Comparative History of Women


    Explores the differences and similarities between women in America, Great Britain, and France in politics, sexuality, community, activism, economics, and religion during the 20th century. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 433 - Women in the Civil Rights Movement


    Analyzes the role of African-American women in the civil rights movement. Identifies key leaders and assesses their leadership skills and styles. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 434 - Black Church in America


    Traces the historical development of the black church in America from the antebellum period to the present. Additionally, explores the role of the black church in the struggle for human equality. Topics include radical, moderate and accommodationist leadership styles; historical development of the black church in the South; and, the emergence of the black church as a foundation for the modern civil rights movement. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 435 - Introduction to Contemporary Africa


    Examines Africa from 1960 to the present. Focuses on the political, economic, social changes and Africa’s integration into the community of nations. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 440 - Methods of Historical Research


    An introduction to the theory and methods of historical inquiry including exploring and evaluating library, archival, and electronic source materials. Prerequisites: Juniors and Seniors Only (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 442 - Families in the African Diaspora


    Examines the values and composition of families of people in societies that are a part of the African Diaspora. A critical and comprehensive examination is made of the life of families in the African Diaspora, including the historical evolution of such families and their relationship with the political-economic structures of African Diaspora societies. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 442B - Pre-Law Internship/History


    Provides the student with a real-life opportunity for a cooperative educational experienced by working with a private attorney, prosecutor, public defender, county administrator, county judge, or another selected public or private law agency. The Internship is a one semester long. The field placement requires a minimum of six (6) hours per week. An individualized plan will be developed as a team by the student faculty, advisor, and the supervisor of the participating organizations. The criteria for evaluation will be determined by the supervisor/faculty advisor (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 443 - Black Images in the Media


    Analyses the role of African Americans in motion pictures and videos as well as sitcoms, television, comedies, and the news. Examines the African-American images projected through electronic and print media, historically and currently. Additionally, the course explores the development of stereotypical portrayals, and investigates the efforts of African-American actors and actresses to overcome these portrayals. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 448 - History Internship


    The History Internship is a one semester long internship. The student, advisor and the supervisor of the participating organizations will develop an individualized plan as a team. These experiences will be based on needs and professional goals of the student. The supervisor and faculty advisor will determine the criteria for evaluation. (3)
  
  •  

    HIST 450 - Senior Research Project in History


    Detailed investigation of a specific topic in History. Prerequisites: HIST 440 . (3)
  
  •  

    HON 100 - Honors First-Year Seminar


    The first-year seminar will introduce all first-year students to the idea of the liberal arts and is structured to demonstrate connections between the disciplines. These courses are designed to teach college-level thinking, writing, and discussion. The course will include an Honors Speakers Series that introduces first-year students to interesting topics and cultural experiences. Topics will vary. (1-4)
  
  •  

    HON 200 - Level Series Honors Seminar


    Honors interdisciplinary seminars are explorations of specific topics designed to demonstrate the interconnectedness of academic disciplines and promote interdisciplinary analysis and problem-solving. These courses are designed to introduce or reinforce college-level thinking, writing, and discussion. Topics will vary. (1-4)
  
  •  

    HON 297 - Honors Research Seminar I


    This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to focus on critical issues in their major field of study. It focuses on conducting a review of the literature central to the students’ selected research interest and on exploring various research methodologies. Students are expected to determine a topic and a thesis and present a research proposal by the end of the semester. A research or thesis course in the department may be substituted for this course. (1-4)
  
  •  

    HON 298 - Honors Seminar: Research Technology


    Using the research proposal developed in HON 297, this course focuses on the research process and on the uses of various technologies for its completion. The course will focus on methods for data collection and data analysis. Students are expected to develop conclusions based on their observations of data and to generate implications for further research. (1-4)
  
  •  

    HON 300 - Honors Junior Prep Seminar: Graduate Exams Prep


    This course is designed to provide preparation for graduate school entrance examination and professional licensure. Prep courses are available for Praxis II, GMAT, GRE, LSAT, and MCAT based on student need. Course components are inclusive of a thorough subject review, problem solving, timed quizzes, practice tests, skill review exercises and actual test simulation. Each course includes 36 contact hours of instruction based on a six-step comprehensive approach: 1) Diagnostic Testing and Assessment, 2) Basic Skills Review, 3) In-Class Problem Solving, Concepts and Strategies, 4) Practice Test Reinforcement, 5) Final Exam, Assessment Report and Review, and 6) Personal Study Plan. These courses are a tremendous value and include all student materials. Prerequisites: HON 200  level seminar. (1-4)
 

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