Oct 23, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


TEP Acronyms

AL - Artistic Literacy IC - Innovation & Creativity SL - Servant Leadership
AW - Advanced Writing ID - Identity TECH - Computer Technology
CAP -  Capstone OC - Oral Communication TW - Teamwork
CT -  Critical Thinking QL - Math WC - Written Communication
FL - Foreign Language/Sign Language SCL - Science with Lab WEL - Wellness
GP - Global Perspective    

 

 
  
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    ENGL 131 - English Composition I


    Introductory college-level writing course which stresses critical reading and thinking and writing as a process. Emphasis on editing and revision skills, vision literacy, oral presentation and the development of basic research skills. (3) T1 WC
  
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    ENGL 131L - English Composition with Lab


    Introductory college-level writing course which stresses critical reading and thinking and writing as a process. Emphasis on editing and revision skills, vision literacy, oral presentation and the development of basic research skills. Lab component utilizes self-paced modules which focuses on grammar, mechanics, etc. (3) T1 WC
  
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    ENGL 132 - English Composition II


    College-level writing course which stresses critical reading and thinking and writing as a process, with a focus on persuasive and literary aims. Emphasis on a research paper or project, MLA documentation style and oral presentation. Prerequisites: ENGL 131 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 150 - Reading Across the Disciplines


    This course builds on reading comprehension skills to master reading for critical thinking, interpretation, and evaluation. Students will read text selections from across the academic disciplines to learn to identify and evaluate evidence and arguments, and interpret meaning and purpose. Students will be encouraged to see the interdisciplinary connections in readings from various curriculums. (3)
  
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    ENGL 224 - Modern English Grammar and Usage


    This course examines the grammatical structure of modern English, with emphasis on grammar analysis at the sentence level and rhetorical grammar. The course will also devote attention to the examination of language variation in English to provide a context for the study of grammar and introduce basic linguistic concepts such as phonology, morphology and semantics. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 225 - Advanced Composition


    Course, conducted as a writing workshop, aims to develop mature writing skills by focusing on refining skills in both expository and argumentative rhetorical modes. Students will work collaboratively to revise their writing and critique peer writing. This course will also emphasize the study of rhetorical strategies and the development of style, voice and advanced proofreading/editing techniques. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 227 - African-American Literature I


    This course offers a historical survey African American literature from its beginnings in slave narratives, through Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and Realism, with authors such as Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, and Claude McKay. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 228 - African-American Literature II


    This course is an in-depth study of selected 20th and 21st Century African American authors, from the modernists to the postmodernists, with emphasis on major contemporary writers. Authors studied may include Nella Larsen, Ralph Ellison, Charles R. Johnson, Toni Morrison, Edward P. Jones, Octavia Butler, and the most recently published authors. Emphasis is on longer works of fiction with more in-depth research on each author. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 231 - World Literature I


    This sequential course is a thematic survey of world classics in translation from antiquity to the sixteenth century, including works from Europe, the Middle East, India and China. Students are encouraged to think critically and creatively about how the literature of various cultures defines what it means to be human. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 232 - World Literature II


    This sequential course surveys world classics from the sixteenth century to the present with a thematic emphasis on Romantic heroes, Realistic heroines, and the colonial experience, including works from Europe, India, South America, Egypt, and South Africa. Students are encouraged to think critically and creatively about the impact of world cultures on contemporary global issues. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 234 - Creative Writing


    This course focuses on the theory and practice of creative writing and introduces students to multiple genres of creative writing, including poetry and short fiction. Students will analyze examples, discuss modern and traditional practice, and then create original pieces. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 235 - Literature of Africa and the Diaspora


    This course covers selected African writers and the literature of the African Diaspora excluding the United States, with a particular emphasis on Caribbean Literature by authors such as Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Jean Rhys, and others. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150  (3)
  
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    ENGL 237 - Introduction to Creative Writing


    This course focuses on the theory and practice of creative writing while introducing students to multiple genres, including poetry and short fiction. Students will analyze examples, discuss modern and traditional practice and craft original works. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 238 - Creative Writing Workshop: Short Fiction


    This course is a workshop in literary fiction where students will learn about and practice craft, while writing and revising their own short stores. Students will consider fundamental elements of fiction and the relationship of narrative structure, style, and content in both the creation of their own work and in classic and modern literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 237 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 239 - Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry


    This course is an introduction to the study and practice of writing poetry. Students will write and revise their own poetry, participate in weekly peer workshops, read and analyze classic and modern poetry, and discuss popular movements in poetry throughout history. Students will work with a variety of forms from sonnets to free verse and learn to utilize a number of figurative and literary devises. Prerequisites: ENGL 237 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 241 - Methods and Materials of Tutoring


    This course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for students interested in working as peers writing tutors. Students will apply the theoretical knowledge they have gained through a practicum component of the course. Successful completion of the course is a prerequisite for tutoring in the Writing Center. Prerequisites: ENGL 132  and instructor permission. (3)
  
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    ENGL 245 - Studies in Literature


    An introduction to novels, short stories, poems, plays by representative African-American, American and continental authors. Formal elements of each genre are examined in cultural and historical context. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 250 - Gender Studies


    This course examines how constructions of gender are reflected and critiqued through gender theories, literary texts, and films. Students are encouraged to think critically about contemporary gender issues within their racial, ethnic, and global cultural contexts. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 260 - Literature and Film


    An interdisciplinary study of selected literary works adapted to film. Students both read selected literary works and watch the adaptation, focusing attention to both the problems and rewards of transforming fiction and/or drama to film. Prerequisites: ENGL 245 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 290 - Businesses and Technical Writing


    In this course, students learn the format, style, and vocabulary appropriate to different types of business and technical writing and produce a number of business and technical documents. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150  (3)
  
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    ENGL 300 - Research Methods


    The course is designed to prepare majors in a variety of disciplines for upper and graduate level research and writing, and to fulfill a research requirement in any department. The course fosters critical thinking by encouraging students to examine and discuss their perspectives as well as bring together ideas and information from their respective disciplines. Prerequisites: ENGL 245  AND ENGL 318  OR ENGL 328  OR ENGL 331 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 318 - African American Literature I


    This course offers a historical survey of African American literature from its beginnings in slave narratives, through Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, and Realism, with authors such as Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Langston, Hughes, and Claude McKay. Prerequisites: ENGL 245 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 319 - African American Literature II


    This course is an in-depth study of selected 20th and 21st Century African American authors, from the modernists to the postmodernists, with emphasis on major contemporary writers. Authors studied may include Nella Larsen, Ralph Ellison, Charles R. Johnson, Toni Morrison, Edward P. Jones, Octavia Butler, and the most recently published authors. Emphasis is on longer works of fiction with more in-depth research on each author. Prerequisites: ENGL 318 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 328 - American Literature I


    This is a critical survey of the diverse literature of the United States from its beginnings to the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and comprehension of the literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 245 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 329 - American Literature II


    This is a critical survey of the diverse literature of the United States after the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and comprehension of the literature studied. Prerequisites: ENGL 328 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 331 - English Literature I


    This survey examines classic works of British literature from the Old English period through the eighteenth century. By providing historical and social contest, this course lays the groundwork for further study of the movements and philosophies that have inspired European civilization as well as for the postcolonial critique of the British Empire. Prerequisites: ENGL 132 ; ENGL 245 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 332 - Global Literature Written in English


    This course surveys significant works of literature written in English as a global language from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. Emphasis is placed on modernism, colonial/post-colonialism, post-modernism. This course examines selected works from the British Isles, British Commonwealth, Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Students are encouraged to think critically and creatively about the impact of English as a global language in an interconnected world. Prerequisites: ENGL 132 ; ENGL 245 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 351 - Special Topics


    A study of a particular literary subject (genre, author, movement, or tradition) not covered by the department’s standard course offerings. May include advanced study of a specific genre, regional literature, or other topics proposed by professors. Students may repeat the course once (for additional credit) but not the topic. Prerequisites: ENGL 245  AND ENGL 318  OR ENGL 328  OR ENGL 331 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 431 - Shakespeare & Film


    In-depth analysis of Shakespearean films and plays, including the cultural politics of the films as they comment on 21st century social, political, and economic issues. Prerequisites: ENGL 132 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 436 - From Wordsworth to Wilde: 19th Century English Literature


    In this course, representative works by the great Romantic and Victorian poets, prose writers, and novelists are discussed within the historical and intellectual contexts of their age. Students are required to write a research paper in this course. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 437 - Twentieth Century English Literature: Literary Texts in A Global Context


    Representative works by significant poets, prose writers, dramatists, and novelists of the English language are studied within their aesthetic and global contexts. Emphasis is placed on the development of aesthetic values, evolving genres, and global literary and intellectual movements. Students are required to write a research paper in this course. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 441 - Literacy Theory


    A survey of major developments in literary and critical theories which aims to reveal the relationships between the theories. Focus is on theories from the 20th and 21st centuries, with some attention to historical perspectives. Prerequisites: ENGL 245  AND ENGL 319  OR ENGL 328  OR ENGL 332 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 445 - Women’s Studies


    The course is designed to examine the experiences of women through an exploration of various literary texts. Students are required to write a research paper in this course. Prerequisites: ENGL 131  AND ENGL 132  OR COMM 204  OR LIS 150 . (3)
  
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    ENGL 450 - Senior Seminar


    Intensive and directed study of special topics in English or American literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 441 . (3)
  
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    ENGR 101 - Introduction to Engineering and Problem Solving


    This course provides general information on engineering disciplines, common engineering practices, the engineering profession and history, engineering education, engineering design, engineering ethics, and engineering opportunities from the instructor and/or invited speakers. Student teams will undertake preliminary work on a design project. (3)
  
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    ENGR 120 - Introduction to Engineering Graphics Design


    This course introduces the student to graphics as used by engineers. Both hand sketching and computer graphics will develop the student’s ability to communicate graphically. This course also investigates the engineering design process. Students will work in teams to acquire a client and design a solution to meet the needs enumerated by this client. This design project is a continuation of design work done in ENGR 101. Each aspect of the design process will be discussed. Several exercises will attempt to develop the student’s creativity, clarity and focus of thought. The semester will end with a full presentation of each team’s design work, which will incorporate their newly acquired graphics ability. Prerequisites: ENGR 101 . (3)
  
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    ENGR 200 - Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering Laboratory


    Laboratory with experiments designed to provide fundamental concepts and an overview of electrical and computer engineering specialization areas including Analog and Digital Electronic Circuits, Solid State Electronic Devices, Communication Systems, Signal Processing and Computer Engineering. Experience with standard laboratory equipment including power supply, multimedia, function generator, oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer. (3)
  
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    ENGR 205 - Engineering Mechanics: Statics


    This course is designed to introduce students to the effects of forces on bodies in static equilibrium and to familiarize them with mathematical techniques for finding reactive forces in bodies, frames, mechanics and trusses. Concepts covered include forces, moments, couples, equilibrium of rigid bodies, centroids, moments of inertia and friction resistance. Prerequisites: PHYS 243 . (3)
  
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    ENGR 208 - Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics


    Kinematics and kinetics of particles in rectangular, cylindrical and curvilinear coordinates systems; energy and momentum methods of particles; kinetic of systems of particles; kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; and motion relative to rotating coordinate systems are studied. Prerequisites: ENGR 205 . (3)
  
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    ENGR 310 - Fluid Mechanics


    Develop an understanding of fluid dynamics in engineering as well as a variety of other fields. Learn to use control volume analysis to develop basic equations and to solve problems. Understand and use differential equations to determine pressure and velocity variations in internal and external flows. Prerequisites: MATH 338 , ENGR 208 . (3)
  
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    ENGR 312 - Thermodynamics


    This course covers the fundamental principles of Thermodynamics as applied to engineering systems. This course provides a foundation in fundamental Thermodynamics phenomena, including the first and second laws of Thermodynamics, Thermodynamics properties, equations of state in real and ideal gases, availability and combustion. Prerequisite: ENGR 310 . (3)
  
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    ENGR 470 - Topics in Engineering


    Offered as needed for the development of new course in engineering. (3)
  
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    EXSC 210 - Introduction to Exercise Science


    Course introduces the foundations of exercise science, including history and philosophy, careers, professional organizations, certifications, research methods, and professional issues. (3)
  
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    EXSC 290 - Leadership in Exercise and Wellness


    This course introduces the broad range of theoretical and applied leadership objectives, investigating leadership theories and paradigms. Evaluating and identifying leadership antecedents and consequences in the disciplines of exercise science and wellness which are important in deciding measurement issues. Developing and applying leadership theories and strategies to adapt to organizations and proactively affect the change in policies and measurements. Design leadership strategies to aid coaches, recreation specialists, and physical educators enhance the performance of individuals, students, athletes, or clients/consumers. Prerequisites: EXSC 210  or Instructor’s Permission. (3)
  
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    EXSC 310 - Strength and Conditioning


    This course introduces the basics of strength training and conditioning. The principles of exercise science will be implemented and customized to individual and group workouts. Emphasis is placed on anatomy, exercise physiology, biomechanics, nutrition, program design, testing, exercise technique, and evaluation. Physical fitness testing will involve weight training, plyometrics, aerobic training, ergogenic aids, and flexibility training. Prerequisites: PE 241  or Instructor’s Permission. (2)
  
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    EXSC 320 - Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Science


    Designed to develop an understanding of measurement and evaluation theories, concepts and practices in exercise science. Examining the validity, reliability, and feasibility of current assessment techniques in exercise science, measured by using basic statistical analyses and practical computer applications. Prerequisites: EXSC 210 , PE 241  or Instructor’s Permission. (3)
  
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    EXSC 340 - Graded Exercise and Testing


    This course will provide students with the theoretical bases of fitness appraisal and exercise prescription, when combined with practical experiences it will enhance the understanding of fitness assessment. Students will gain knowledge in test administration and interpretation, screening, emergency procedures, and exercise prescription. The testing will involve aerobic assessment (treadmill/ergometer), ECG, body composition, musculoskeletal, and cardiorespiratory. Prerequisites: EXSC 310 , EXSC 320 , PE 241  or Instructor’s Permission. (3)
  
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    EXSC 350 - Training for Sport Performance


    This course is designed to expose students to the skills necessary to develop an annual training program for individuals and athletes of all levels. Students will be exposed to the principles of periodization and how to determine the appropriate training program for various sports. The course will cover the topics of plyometrics, speed, agility, strength, and power. Prerequisites: PE 241 , EXSC 310 , EXSC 320  or Instructor’s Permission. (3)
  
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    EXSC 360 - Motor Learning/Behavior


    This course will expose students to the theoretical perspectives and current principles associated with the control and learning of movement skills. The neural and mechanical mechanisms underlying motor behavior and the variables influencing the changes in motor learning will be evaluated. The application of theoretical concepts in instructional and clinical settings will be addressed. Prerequisites: PE 241 . (3)
  
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    EXSC 370 - Physiology of Sport and Exercise


    This course is designed to explore concepts of physiological functions of the human body during physical activity, exercise, and stress. The cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular, ergogenic aids, performance, nutrition, sex differences, body weight, physical activity, and neurological control of movement will be studied to determine their effect on physiology. Prerequisites: AHMS 310, PE 241 . (3)
  
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    EXSC 380 - Biomechanics


    Introductory course on the basic principles of biomechanics and their application to human movement. Several analyses will be done on the efficiency of movement involving mechanical and anatomical principles and their application to human movement. Prerequisites: PE 241 , PHYS 241 , EXSC 320  or Instructor’s Permission. (3)
  
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    EXSC 400 - Exercise Prescription


    This course will provide students with an understanding of clinical exercise testing and prescription for healthy and patients with diseases of cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, and immunogenic systems. The students will learn the pathophysiology and exercise responses in several populations and aligning results with the standards of Clinical Exercise Physiologists and American College of Sports Medicine. Students will evaluate applicable exercise assessment techniques in the laboratory and clinical exercise settings. Prerequisites: EXSC 310 , EXSC 320 , EXSC 340 , or Instructor’s Permission. (3)
  
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    EXSC 410 - Exercise Physiology


    This course examines the operation and adaptation of human organ systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, skeletal, and hormonal) during exercise. The clinical aspects of exercise, training, nutrition, performance, ergogenic aids, and genetics will be reviewed to determine their various effects. Prerequisites: PE 241 , AHMS 310, or Instructor’s Permission. (3)
  
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    EXSC 420 - Epidemiology of Physical Activity


    This course will provide students with an understanding of health-related physical activity. The course will cover behavioral sciences theories, individual and team physical activity research, developments in local, city, state, national, and international public health interventions to promote physical activity. Prerequisites: EXSC 340 , EXSC 370 , EXSC 410  or Instructors Permission. (3)
  
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    EXSC 430 - Organization and Administration of Exercise Science


    (3) This course presents an overview of organizational and administrative issues relative to the planning, design, and management of exercise science, health, and wellness programs. Opportunities will be provided to observe and evaluate current exercise science programs and facilities. Analysis and application of core management leadership skills in managing personnel, equipment, subjects, and research protocols will be evaluated and presented. Prerequisites: Senior or Instructor’s Permission. (3)
  
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    EXSC 440 - Practicum in Exercise Science


    Practicum provides opportunities for students to obtain practical experience in clinical, research, and job settings related to the field of Exercise Science. It also enables the Exercise Science program to evaluate the student’s skills, knowledge, and performance. Prerequisites: JUNIOR or Instructor’s Permission (1)
  
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    EXSC 450 - Internship in Exercise Science


    This course provides students with a culminating field-based experience that is designed to implement the gained knowledge from courses in the Exercise Science program. Students will obtain an internship within their desired career field. This course will enable students to obtain the necessary hours to qualify to take national certification exams and gain the hours needed to apply to occupational and physical therapy programs. Prerequisites: SENIOR STATUS or Instructor’s Permission. (3)
  
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    FIM 111 - Intro to Film


    Intro to Film provides an introduction to creating, understanding, and enjoying the world of filmmaking, both from the audiences’ or filmmaker’s perspective. Students will learn about he basic techniques used by filmmakers in directing, screenwriting, and acting for the camera. Through lecture, discussion, demonstration, screenings, and other materials, students will become familiar with the vocabulary of the medium and gain a deeper appreciation for the technical and artistic elements that compose a film. This course will also introduce students to the history of filmmaking and some of its important contributors. Prerequisites: None. (3)
  
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    FIM 160 - History of Black Cinema


    History of Black Cinema is a study of the important contributions made by Black filmmakers and actors, from the first all black cast film produced in 1919, (“The Homesteader” by filmmaking pioneer Oscar Micheaux) to today’s many great African American directors and actors. There will also be an introduction of international films produced by Black filmmakers. By the end of this course, students will have a strong understanding of both the historic and present day contributions made by Black filmmakers, through which students may examine their place in film history. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film   (3)
  
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    FIM 225 - Introduction to Screenwriting


    Students will be introduced to proper screenwriting format, character development, and the basic elements of dramatic story structure through conception, writing, and re-writing of short narrative screenplays. Students further their understanding of cinematic writing through script analysis and script coverage-writing assignments. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film  (3)
  
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    FIM 250 - Intro to Production


    This course familiarizes Film majors at Saint Augustine’s University with the technical rigors of production as well as safety procedures and production protocols that are to be strictly adhered to. Basic camera, electric, lighting, and rigging instruments and techniques will be examined. Students will also receive a copy of the Film major’s production handbook, which will provide a manual reference to key aspects of production outlined in this course. Students will also be introduced to the Film major’s website which will be a central distribution point for updates concerning scheduling, production forms, and course related documentation supplemental to classroom instruction. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film   (3)
  
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    FIM 290 - Visual Aesthetics


    Utilizing a 35MM digital camera, students will study various composition techniques and methodologies implemented in the creation of the accomplished moving image. Students will learn to understand how lens selection, aspect ratios, various angles, motion, shape and color composition affect images in the frame. Students will also learn how to use these visual tools to successfully convey mood and meaning in their productions. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film . (3)
  
  
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    FIM 320 - Film Theory & Criticism


    This course will survey film theory and criticism, including film semiotics, classical film theory, psychoanalytic film theory, narrative theory, and reception theory. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film , FIM 290 - Visual Aesthetics  
  
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    FIM 325 - Feature Screenwriting I


    Through this advanced screenwriting course students will continue their study of plot, character development, dialogue, and format, In addition, students will be introduced to the se-up, transitions, and mid-point, as they develop the first half (45 pages) of a full-length screenplay which will be completed in Feature Screenwriting II. Students will also learn the art and craft of re-writing. Students will be required to develop treatments and learn about the business of screenwriting, which includes the art of “the pitch”. Students will also learn to work in a workshop environment as they learn how to analyze and critique each other’s work. Prerequisites: FIM 225 - Introduction to Screenwriting . (3)
  
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    FIM 335 - Film Analysis


    In Film Analysis students will learn how to read a film, understand cinematic language, and break down a scene. Students will also become acquainted with why and how movie watchers respond as they do to different films. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film . (3)
  
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    FIM 340 - Motion Picture Directing


    This course will examine the theory and practice of film directing, and the director’s role in creating a vision and approach to a dramatic work. Students will understand the director’s responsibility in acting as the guiding force in the creation of visual and aural images. Through exercises and short projects, students will assume the role of director in order to develop their creative eye and sensibilities. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film , FIM 290 - Visual Aesthetics .
  
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    FIM 350 - Motion Picture Production Workshop I


    Students will learn the fundamentals of narrative and documentary motion picture production. Students will participate collectively in various roles of a production crew that will produce one narrative silent short film and one short documentary film. Students will assume various roles in each production in order to fully understand what strategic team-approach these two unique production environments require in order to be successful. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film  FIM 225 - Introduction to Screenwriting  FIM 250 - Intro to Production  and  FIM 290 - Visual Aesthetics .
  
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    FIM 355 - World Cinema


    Students will examine how cultures around the world utilize the medium of film to tell narrative and documentary stories. Students will observe various cinematic works from different global cultures and examine how historic and geographical aspects influenced their production. Students will also examine the impact of American, particularly Hollywood, filmmaking and distribution on world cultures and economies. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film . (3)
  
  
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    FIM 375 - Editing


    Students will learn the basic contemporary techniques of non-linear editing and their origins through study of the history of the motion picture editing process. Students will also familiarize themselves with the two dominant non-linear editing platforms: AVID and Final Cut Pro. Through tutorials and short exercises students will understand how to import, manipulate, and export creatively edited motion pictures. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film  FIM 290 - Visual Aesthetics  
  
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    FIM 380 - Producing


    This course will expose students to the basics of motion picture producing, including development, pre-production, production and distribution/marketing. Students will also learn the specifics of budgeting, acquisitions, crew, appearance and location agreements, music licensing and other rights clearances, as well as the importance and purpose of the Screen Actor’s Guild. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film  FIM 350 - Motion Picture Production Workshop I .
  
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    FIM 390 - Psychology, Symbolism, and Metaphor in Film


    Students will examine how cinematic conventions, visual metaphors, and various cultural symbols are utilized to convey meaning in various cinematic works. Students will understand the history of these various aspects and cross-reference their use in other art works in order to understand their correlation to the use in films being examined. Prerequisites: FIM 111 - Intro to Film  FIM 290 - Visual Aesthetics .
  
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    FIM 400 - New Media


    This course will focus on the expanding world of New Media, including the internet, smart phones, podcasting, web episodes, and webinars, streaming video, social media and the impact of these features on the global village. Students will study the history, present, and the future of New Media. Students will also produce a short New Media project. Prerequisites: FIM 350 - Motion Picture Production Workshop I . (3)
  
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    FIM 420 - Animation


    Students will learn the basics of stop motion animated picture production. They will take this knowledge and implement similar techniques through the use of computer animation software. Students will walk away from the course with an animated short. Prerequisites: FIM 350 - Motion Picture Production Workshop I . (3)
  
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    FIM 425 - Feature Screenwriting II


    This course is a continuation of Feature Screenwriting I. Students will do a re-write of the first half of their original screenplay and then move on to develop and write the last half of the screenplay. Focus will include transitions, resolution, climax, and final re-rewrites. Through this course students will revisit their knowledge of plot, character development, dialogue, format, set-up, and transitions. In this class, students will interact in a workshop environment as they continue to learn how to analyze and critique each other’s work. Prerequisites: FIM 325 - Feature Screenwriting I  (3)
  
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    FIM 430 - Film Seminar


    This course offers students the opportunity to explore different topics in film not currently offered in the major core, or as electives. Film Seminar may be taken no more than twice-once as a major elective, and once as a free elective. In both instances, the course topic must be different. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.
  
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    FIM 435 - Documentary Production


    Documentary Production introduces students to the art and history of documentary filmmaking. Through the viewing of a series of assigned documentaries, as well as lectures, discussions, and demonstrations and readings, students will build on their introduction to documentary production in FIM 350 , and learn about different approaches to the documentary form, conceptualizing the documentary, and the documentary production process. Students will also study techniques in research, interviewing, composing shots, editing, and working as part of a production team. Students will produce a short documentary at the end of the course, in preparation for possible matriculation to FIM 460 , Advanced Documentary. Prerequisites: FIM 250 - Intro to Production  FIM 290 - Visual Aesthetics .
  
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    FIM 450 - Cinematography


    Students will learn advanced techniques using various film technologies to capture the moving image. Students will use advanced cameras and related equipment specifically designated for this instruction. The understanding of variable frame rates, lens selection and qualities, formats, shutter speeds, and lighting will be achieved through hands-on intensive class instruction. Prerequisites: FIM 350 - Motion Picture Production Workshop I  FIM 360 - Motion Picture Production Workshop II .
  
  
  
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    FIM 470 - Advanced Documentary


    Students will examine various advanced production techniques specifically implemented in the production of documentary films. Students will conduct preproduction on a documentary project to be submitted for thesis production. Prerequisites: FIM 435 , FIM 470. (3)
  
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    FIM 475 - Advanced Editing and Compositing


    Students will learn advanced editing and film compositing techniques. Utilizing Apple Motion and Adobe After Effects software, students will learn how to creatively manipulate the moving image to create special effects. Masking, compositing, green screen techniques, and motion graphic generation will be focused on in will be focused on in this course. Prerequisites: FIM 350 , FIM 375 . (3)
  
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    FIM 480 - Internship


    This course offers students college-credit for practical experience in theatrical or film/video production. Students will be assigned significant responsibilities determined by their needs, abilities, and professional emphasis, and by the needs of and opportunities offered by sponsoring organizations. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
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    FIM 490 - Thesis


    As a Capstone course, students will demonstrate their cumulative comprehension of cinema through production of an advanced motion picture project previously written in Advanced Screenwriting and pre-produced in either Advanced Documentary OR Advanced Narrative. Students will shop their screenplays if they choose the screenwriting options. Prerequisites: Permission of chair.
  
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    FLCH 131 - Elementary Chinese I


    This course is designed for students who have no knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed to lay a foundation for understanding, speaking, listening, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese. Practical daily-used expressions and basic language knowledge are the central part of the studying. Some Chinese culture will also be introduced. (3) T1 FL
  
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    FLCH 132 - Elementary Chinese II


    This course is the continuation of the study of Mandarin Chinese. It is designed for the students who have taken FLCH 131  or equivalent courses to enhance their skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing Mandarin Chinese. Practical daily-used expressions and basic language knowledge are the central part of the studying. Some Chinese culture will also be introduced. Prerequisite:  FLFR 131 or proficiency test. (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 131 - Elementary French I


    Course for beginners. Introduction to spoken and written French. Emphasis on sentences and vocabulary related to everyday situations. Knowledge of basic speech patterns supplemented with a broad study of the culture and civilization of French speaking countries.  (3)
  
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    FLFR 132 - Elementary French II


    Continued emphasis on the spoken and written language. Knowledge of basic speech patterns supplemented with a broad study of the culture and civilization of French speaking countries.  Prerequisites: FLFR 131  or proficiency test. (3)
  
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    FLFR 231 - Intermediate French I


    Continuation of the study of the language through reading, writing and conversation with emphasis on grammar. Prerequisites: FLFR 132   (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 232 - Intermediate French II


    Part II of Intermediate French. Continuation of the study of language through reading, writing and conversation with emphasis on grammar. Prerequisites: FLFR 231   (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 233 - Business Communication I


    Readings and discussion of contemporary business practices. Development of business vocabulary, writing, and cross-cultural skills. Prerequisites: FLFR 232   (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 234 - Business Communication II


    Part II of Business Communication. Readings and discussion of contemporary business practices. Development of business vocabulary, writing, and cross-cultural skills. (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 235 - Conversation and Phonetics I


    Oral and written practice of the language. Prerequisites: FLFR 132   (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 236 - Conversation and Phonetics II


    Oral and written practice of the language. Prerequisites: FLFR 235   (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 331 - Survey of French Literature


    Readings and discussions of works from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Readings will be in English and French. Prerequisites: FLFR 232 . (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 332 - Survey of French Literature


    Readings and discussions of works from the classical to the contemporary periods. Readings will be in English and French. Prerequisites: FLFR 232 . (3)
  
  •  

    FLFR 333 - French Civilization


    A study of the historical eras of France, her cultural development in an era, with emphasis on the arts and philosophy. The French experience in Africa and in the Caribbean. Discussions will be in English. (3)
  
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    FLFR 334 - French Literature of the 17th and 18th Centuries


    The Golden Age and Enlightenment in French literature. (3)
  
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    FLFR 335 - French Literature of the 17th and 18th Centuries


    The Golden Age and Enlightenment in French literature. (3)
 

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