Nov 17, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


TEP Acronyms

AL - Artistic Literacy IC - Innovation & Creativity SL - Servant Leadership
AW - Advanced Writing ID - Identity TECH - Computer Technology
CAP -  Capstone OC - Oral Communication TW - Teamwork
CT -  Critical Thinking QL - Math WC - Written Communication
FL - Foreign Language/Sign Language SCL - Science with Lab WEL - Wellness
GP - Global Perspective    

 

 
  
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    CJ 405 - Ethics in Criminal Justice


    Ethics in Criminal Justice explores the nature of morality and the history of philosophical discussions of “good” and “evil.” These discussions will be placed within the context of American criminal justice practice and theory. Unique problems facing Law Enforcement, the Courts, and Corrections will be examined, as well as the ethical dilemmas facing policy makers and government officials struggled to redefine security in the global, media-saturated Post 9/11 era. Prerequisite CJ 301 . (3)
  
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    CJ 407 - Sentencing


    Analysis of various sentence structures for both misdemeanor and felony offenders on the federal and state levels with regard to regional aspects. Particular attention is paid to extended terms for dangerous offenders and to the relationship between type and length of sentence to time and conditions of sentences actually served. Prerequisite(s): CJ 302  and junior or senior class standing. (3)
  
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    CJ 410 - Community Policing


    This course will introduce students to the newest philosophy in policing American societies. Students will explore theoretical and practical dimensions of modern policing that unite police and communities in solving social problems. Prerequisite: CJ 235 . (3)
  
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    CJ 412 - Correctional Management


    This course will introduce students to the many dynamics involved with managing corrections facilities with concerns of managing both inmates and correctional staff in the different security level prison systems. The course will begin with an in-depth study of the early American corrections systems, the evolution of the prisoner’s rights movement, and constitutional legislations used to form prisoner’s rights in the modern penal systems. The course will conclude with a study of managing corrections facilities given basic management principles as applied to managing corrections staff and inmates. Prerequisite: CJ 210 . (3)
  
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    CJ 415 - Media and Crime


    This course will explore how public attitudes and policies are shaped by the unique relationship between criminal justice and modern media. News media, popular culture, academic scholarship, and criminal justice produced media will all be examined to help students understand how societal beliefs about crime and justice are shaped by the complex and sometimes dangerous educative functions of the media. Students will be encouraged to consume and discuss various media sources critically with the objective of understanding how their own beliefs and knowledge of the criminal justice system are constructed. Prerequisite: CJ 302 . (3)
  
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    CJ 418 - White Collar and Corporate Crime


    This course provides an overview of the definitional and theoretical challenges for exploring the phenomenon of “while collar crime.” Students will be encouraged to compare and contrast corporate crime, political crime, and organized crime to determine how each applies to the various definitions of “white collar crime.” A comparison between the etiology of “suite” and “street” crime will also be provided to help students understand the similarities and differences these crimes exhibit in terms of victims, offenders, criminal justice system responses, and general implications for society. Prerequisite: CJ 301 . (3)
  
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    CJ 420 - Criminal Justice Seminar


    Through a series of seminars, workshops and a guest lecture series, the course focuses on self-awareness, self-confidence and navigating personal and professional success maps in setting goals for careers in the criminal justice field. Prerequisite: CJ 301 .
  
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    CJ 425 - Police Organization Management


    An advanced course focusing upon management theories, current management systems, supervision and supervisory principles as applied to police administration. This course examines leadership skills, planning and implementation, decision-making and creative problem solving for the police administrator. Prerequisites: CJ 235 , CJ 410 . (3)
  
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    CJ 440 - Contemporary Problems in Policing


    An analysis of both traditional and contemporary critical law enforcement issues, including organized crime, terrorism, computer crime, corruption, police use of deadly force, alcohol, drugs, policing of civil and natural disturbances, and the diffusion and multiplicity of police agencies; crime reporting, assessment difficulties, and the public reaction. Prerequisite(s): CJ 235  and junior or senior class standing. (3)
  
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    CJ 450 - Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice


    This course is designed to introduce special topic instructions on current subjects related to the criminal justice field. The course will provide students with current, debatable topics related to policy, practices and developments in the criminal justice arena. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. (3)
  
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    CJ 460 - Criminal Justice Honors Seminar


    This course allows students to work on an individual basis with a faculty member in an area of interest. Prerequisites: Criminal Justice Honor’s status with a criminal justice grade point average 3.3; Senior Standing. (3)
  
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    CJ 470 - Substance Abuse, Crime, & Criminal Justice


    This course examines the extent and correlates of illicit drug use, drug dealing, and alcohol abuse in the United States with other forms of criminal behavior and its impact on the individuals, communities, and the criminal justice system (i.e. law enforcement, courts, and correctional treatment issues); estimates are that a largely significant portion of violent crime in the United States is correlated with alcohol and drug use. Addresses efforts to reduce the supply of and demand for illicit drugs, including street-level law enforcement, military intervention, education, treatment, and drug testing are reviewed. Legal issues in drug policy, including the drug legalization debate, are considered. Prerequisite(s): CJ 235 , CJ 301 , CJ 210  and junior or senior class standing. (3)
  
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    CJ 480 - Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice


    Course examines women’s experiences as (a) offenders, (b) victims and (c) criminal justice employees. Examines female criminality including characteristics of female offenders, the adjudication of female defendants and offender classification systems are reviewed for their relevance to understanding motivational and behavioral patterns in female offenders. Crime causal theories (biological, sociological, psychological) are evaluated for their compatibility with female crime. Examines social and policy issues in criminal justice responses to female victimization, particularly in domestic violence and rape cases. Addresses the impact of the integration of women into the criminal justice professions. Prerequisite(s): Senior class standing. (3)
  
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    CJ 490 - Correctional Counseling


    An overview of counseling and rehabilitation approaches for correctional inmates, which are relevant to contemporary corrections. Prerequisites: CJ 210 , CJ 412 . (3)
  
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    COMM 201 - Communication Skills


    This course teaches techniques and strategies on the art of listening, speaking, and writing effectively, especially in the public, interpersonal, and small group contexts of communication. Emphasis is placed on providing the student with activities that help acquire competencies in all three modes of communication. (3)
  
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    COMM 202 - Survey of Mass Communication


    This course examines the nature, function, and impact of mass communication in America: radio, television, newspapers, books, magazines, film, the Internet and news media, public relations and advertising in modern America. It will also offer an overview of career opportunities in mass media. It will explore how each medium plays a significant role in our culture and society through an overview of its history, technology, and social and political issues in the U.S. and abroad. Prerequisites: ENGL 131 , ENGL 132  and COMM 201 . (3)
  
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    COMM 204 - Copy Editing


    Writing involves the art of rewriting. In this lecture/laboratory class students develop skills to edit their own work and that of others by learning the theory and practice of copy editing. Students will learn how to read various types of texts to assess their meaning, clarity and completeness; they will sharpen their grammar and spelling skills, and learn how to check facts using websites familiar to working journalists; they will learn how to rewrite stories and write headlines. The Associated Press Style Book and Manual will be used.
  
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    COMM 211 - Writing for Radio and TV


    This course teaches the fundamentals of writing news, commercials and PSAs for radio, television and the Internet. It applies theories of visual communication (use of cameras) and aural communication (use of microphones and natural sound) to scriptwriting. Basic video editing concepts will also be identified in this course to help students appreciate the importance of style, format and dramatic structure to tell compelling stories. Prerequisites: ENGL 131 , ENGL 132 , and COMM 201 . (3)
  
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    COMM 218 - News Writing and Writing


    This is a lecture/laboratory course emphasizing basic skills for news gathering and journalistic writing. This course concentrates on the role of the reporter in determining content, gathering information and using the basic structure of journalistic writing as applied to newspapers, websites, radio, television and public relations. Students gain hands-on experience in finding real stories and writing and submitting them for publication. This course also focuses on tailoring writing skills to meet the demands of news media, such as blogs, Facebook and Twitter. Prerequisites: ENGL 131 , ENGL 132 , and COMM 201 . (3)
  
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    COMM 300 - Voice and On-Camera Presentation Skills


    This course will give students a mastery of approaches and techniques used in broadcast vocal delivery and on-camera presentation. Emphasis will be placed on diction and articulation, body language, and skills specifically geared to presentation and performance on camera. This course is beneficial for broadcasting and public relations, business, film/theatre, and student-athletes. (3)
  
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    COMM 301 - Media Sales and Promotion


    Students learn basic components of media sales, promotion and advertising. Study emphasizes print and electronic media sales techniques and marketing strategies, as well as discussion of the ethical facets involved in sales and promotion. Students learn how to make sales presentations based on information from market research. (3)
  
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    COMM 311 - Digital Journalism and Social Media


    This course will (1) introduce students to the various types of social and interactive media and (2) teach students how to utilize social media tools in their fields of expertise. Additionally, this course will help students understand and apply the principles and laws of freedom of speech and the press, demonstrate an understanding of professional ethical principles, and work ethically in pursuit of truth, accuracy, fairness and diversity.
  
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    COMM 313 - Introduction to Public Relations


    This course introduces students to the professional field of public relations and the related field of marketing. It examines the principles, practices and issues involved in enhancing the reputation of organizations and high profile individuals and helping them communicate effectively with their target publics, both internal and external. It looks at current examples of public relations and helps students explore the types of careers in this broad field, including working for agencies, businesses, nonprofits, government, sports organizations and individuals. This course also focuses on tailoring writing skills to meet the demands of new media such as blogs, Facebook and Twitter. Prerequisites: COMM or approval of the Instructor. (3)
  
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    COMM 314 - Fundamentals of Photography


    The course is a comprehensive introduction to photography, including instruction in taking, developing and printing pictures. Emphasis is placed upon the development of a sensitive photographic eye and upon photography as an art form. Basic techniques include filmmaking, enlarging, pinhole camera, etc. A good camera (35mm preferably) is required. Fee required (3)
  
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    COMM 321 - Organizational Communications


    The course emphasizes the importance of communication in the organization. Students will concentrate on communication flow, non-verbal cues, and other factors, which have a direct influence on organizational effectiveness. Prerequisites: COMM 202 , COMM 218  and Junior Status. (3)
  
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    COMM 328 - Advanced Reporting and Writing


    This course continues to develop the skills taught in News Reporting and Writing, including cultivating sources, conducting interviews and attending news events. Students will focus on integrating research into their news stories to develop in-depth and investigative reporting skills. Students are required to submit articles for publication. This course also focuses on tailoring writing skto meet the demands of news media such as blogs, Facebook and Twitter. Prerequisites: COMM 218  or approval of the Instructor. (3)
  
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    COMM 331 - Broadcast and Film Editing


    This course provides an introduction to the theory and practices of film and video post-production. Students will study representative works of television and film in the context of aesthetic values, evolving genres, and technical innovations. This course includes multiple hands-on editing projects. Prerequisites: COMM 211  or approval of the Instructor. Fee required. (3)
  
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    COMM 341 - Feature Writing


    This course provides practice in developing and writing feature stories for newspapers, magazines and online publications. It emphasizes interviewing skills, weekly writing assignments, and using creative and individual approaches to each human-interest story. This course also focuses on tailoring writing skills to meet the demands of news media such as blogs, Facebook and Twitter. Prerequisites: COMM 218  or approval of the Instructor. (3)
  
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    COMM 350 - Media Law


    This course concentrates on a rigorous examination of the First Amendment and its application to the media. Areas of study include an understanding of the United States Court system and trial procedures, along with laws governing libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraint, and other pertinent topics. Prerequisites: COMM 202 , COMM 218  and Junior Status. (3)
  
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    COMM 351 - Desktop Design


    This lecture/laboratory class concentrates on theoretical and production aspects of publications. Emphasis is placed on learning electronic desktop design and general principles for using typography, white space, copy block and other phenomena. Page-maker software is used. Prerequisites: COMM 218 . (3)
  
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    COMM 360 - Media Research Methods


    The course is an introduction to the use of documents and observational methods, the interview and the questionnaire in political and social research, as they relate to the media practitioner. Prerequisites: COMM 218  or approval of the Instructor. (3)
  
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    COMM 411 - Video Production I


    This course provides the opportunity for students to learn proper acquisition of field video and audio for use in news and public affairs packages, commercials and video essays. Basic videotape editing skills will be developed through hands-on assignments. Students will conduct research and interviews to create informative and factual video packages. Equipment is provided by the Department. (3)
  
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    COMM 412 - Video Production II


    This course builds on knowledge obtained in COMM 411 , Video Production I. This course concentrates on increasing the student’s knowledge of preparing field-acquired news and public affairs packages. Students will be responsible for gathering footage for multiple video projects using equipment provided by the Department. Videotape editing and portfolio building are elements of this course. Prerequisites: COMM 211  and COMM 411 . (3)
  
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    COMM 415 - Broadcast Management


    The course focuses on the study and analysis of problems and situations confronting the manager of the broadcast enterprise; as pertain to personnel, operation, government relations, and programming sales. Prerequisites: COMM 218 . (3)
  
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    COMM 423 - Audio Production


    This is the study of audio production techniques and technology used to make music and other studio-related products. Technological advancement is also studied. Prerequisites: COMM 218 . Fee required (3)
  
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    COMM 425 - Online News Production


    This is a hands-on course that teaches theoretical and practical aspects of producing an online version of a newspaper. The course explores the differences between content produced primarily for print and content produced primarily for the Internet. Students will plan and manage an online news site, including creating and maintaining a blog; editing and uploading photos, video and audio; and online promotion of content. Students will gain insight into potential fields of employment as well as practical experience needed to pursue internships or employment. Prerequisites: COMM 218  or approval of the Instructor. (3)
  
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    COMM 427 - Publication Concepts


    This is an advanced, hands-on course that teaches theoretical and practical aspects of producing a newspaper, magazine, newsletter or other publication. Students will use skills gained through previous classes to plan and coordinate various publications. Students will also learn the technical aspects of producing a print publication, including preparing photos and designing and laying out pages. Students will gain insight into potential fields of employment as well as practical experience needed to pursue internships or employment. Prerequisites: COMM 218 , and approval of the faculty advisor to the student newspaper or JMC Department Chair. (3)
  
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    COMM 430 - Public Relations Problem Solving


    This course is an advanced study of the field of public relations and emphasis on both individual efforts and group activity in solving real life public relations problems. It emphasizes strategic thinking and career development in the areas of public relations, marketing, sports marketing and its sub categories, including media relations, community relations, event planning, and use of interactive and new digital and social media. Prerequisites: COMM 313  or approval of the Instructor. (3)
  
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    COMM 435 - Directed Studies


    The purpose of this course is to offer students individually tailored projects with emphasis on increasing the student’s knowledge of the media, including commercial practices. Selected topics to be determined by the student and JMC faculty mentor. Prerequisites: COMM 218  and Junior or Senior status. (3)
  
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    COMM 457 - Seminar in Special Communications Topics


    This course is a study of a particular subject in communications. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. Prerequisites: COMM 218  and Senior status. (3)
  
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    COMM 458 - Internship


    This course concentrates on fieldwork, which offers students an opportunity to work part-time in professional media facilities in Raleigh in addition to WAUG. Prerequisites: COMM 350  and Senior Status. Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 140 - Foundations of Computer Science


    A first course in foundation concepts of Computer Science for Computing majors: data representation and manipulation, computer organization, networks and internet, algorithms, programming languages, operating systems, data types and structures, files and databases, software engineering and design, theory of computation. Includes hands-on computer lab experience integrated into the content presentation. (3)
  
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    CSC 245 - Computer Graphics


    This course provides an introduction to graphic design and execution of pictorial graphics using a variety of software packages. Emphasis is placed on creation and manipulation of images using graphic design software. Upon completion, students should be able to create graphic designs and incorporate these designs into printed publications. Prerequisites: CIS 203  and CIS 240 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 250 - Introduction to Web Design


    An introduction to HTML programming. Introduction to WEB Design using available WEB-Design editors like Front Page. It is the aim of this course to provide students with an opportunity to enhance their knowledge of designing WEB pages using HTML programming and using some other WEB editors. Advanced instruction focusing on home page designing, computer graphics, and Internet is provided. Prerequisites: CIS 203  and CIS 240 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 280 - Networking Essentials


    This course examines the principles of contemporary computer networks. Topics include LAN topologies and design; cable characteristics; cable, interface cards, server, and client installation; basic management techniques; linking networks; and troubleshooting LAN problems. Upon completion, students should be able to install both hardware and software for a small client/server LAN and troubleshoot common network problems. Prerequisites: CIS 203  and CIS 240 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 303 - Assembly Language Programming


    This course introduces the basic principles of computer systems, data representation, numbering systems, instruction execution, symbolic coding, data word definition, laterals, location counter, indexing, indirect addressing, relative addressing, and assembly systems. Students will learn to write programs in assembly language. Prerequisites: CIS 260 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 305 - Programming in C++


    This course serves as an introduction and overview of the C++ programming language. Prerequisites: CIS 260 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 307 - Java Programming


    This course provides an introduction to computing in Java. Emphasis is placed on algorithm development and problem solving. Careful and methodical development of Java applications and applets from specifications; documentation and style; appropriate use of control structures; classes and methods; data types and data abstraction; object-oriented techniques and language syntax. Java class libraries including strings, graphical user interfaces, events, exceptions, arguments, threads, file i/o, and networking. Prerequisites: CIS 260 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 310 - String Processing Languages


    This course covers syntax and semantics of a string manipulation language, currently PERL. Application of the language to programming problems in non-numeric areas. Discussion of other string processing languages such as SNOBOL-4. Prerequisites: CSC 305 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 403 - Data Communications and Networks


    This course deals with basic principles of computer networks, data communications systems, common carriers, wafts lines, tariff, distribution systems, types of computer networks, application of networks, network architecture, regulatory issues and network management. Prerequisites: CIS 260 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 404 - Data Structures


    This course deals with the basic concepts of data representation and structures such as lists, trees, strings, arrays, stacks, queues, and algorithms for searching and sorting, using a high level language. Prerequisites: CSC 305 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 406 - File Organization and Processing


    Hardware characteristics of storage devices. Basic file organizations including sequential, direct, and indexed sequential; hashing and collision resolution; perfect hashing; signatures; bloom filters; sorting and other bit level structures. Tree structures including binary search trees, B-trees, and tries. Dynamic hashing techniques. Structures including grid files. Applying file structures to practical problems. Prerequisites: CSC 404 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 407 - Linux Operating System


    An in-depth course in the LINUX Operating System. Taking a hands-on practical approach, this course guides the student through the basics of LINUX concepts, architecture, and administration. Students will use a combination of text readings, lectures, homework questions and hands-on lab problems and practical exercises to practice and master skills which include Using LINUX commands, shell programming, database management, text editing and utilities. Students will also be introduced to Perl, CGI, C/C++ programming. Prerequisites: CIS 306 .
  
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    CSC 410 - Object Oriented Programming


    This course covers object-oriented programming using a language such as C++ or Ada. Using the concept of OOP introduce the concepts of code reuse, encapsulation, incremental development and testing, and program design. Using the concept of classes, describe the evolution of and motivation for the object-oriented paradigm. Prerequisites: CSC 404 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 420 - Theory of Computation


    This course explores formal models of computation such as finite state automata, pushdown automata and Turing machines will be studied, along with the corresponding elements of formal languages (including regular expressions, context-free languages, and recursively innumerable languages). These models will be used to provide a mathematical basis for the study of computability, and to provide an induction to formal theory behind compiler construction. The study of Church’s thesis and universal Turing machines will lead to the study of unsolvable problems. Prerequisites: CSC 305  and MATH 174 . (3)
  
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    CSC 450 - Simulation


    Discrete-event stochastic simulation for the modeling and analysis of systems. Programming of simulation models in a simulation language. Input data analysis, variance reduction techniques, validation and verification, and analysis of simulation output. Random number generators. Prerequisites: CSC 404 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 460 - Organization of Programming Languages


    This course constitutes as an introduction to the formal study of programming language concepts, including syntax and grammar, data types and structures. Run-time behavior characteristics of several languages are analyzed and compared. Prerequisites: CSC 404 . Fee required (3)
  
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    CSC 480 - Special Topics in Computer Science


    This capstone course provides learners with an opportunity to demonstrate the knowledge and abilities acquired through prior study. Learners participate in projects and seminars pertaining to topics selected on the basis of new and emerging business procedures, technology, and standards of practice in the discipline of Computer Science. Mastery and competence in the discipline are also evaluated through the writing and preparation of a research project. Prerequisites: ENGL 290  and CSC 305 . Fee required (3)
  
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    DIVSS 100 - Learning to Learn in the Social Sciences


    This course is designed to improve the overall academic performance of Social Science majors and minors. The course is designed to “enhance students’ skills in generating questions, reading for comprehension, developing test-taking strategies, writing research papers as well as analytical essays, scheduling coursework and writing to answer questions.” Skills taught and learned in this course are expected to be applied to other academic areas not only in the Social Sciences but in general education courses and courses offered in other departments on campus. The course is required of all majors and minors who did not attain a High School 2.5 cumulative GPA. The student must successfully complete the course with a “C” or better before he or she is allowed to take core courses in the major. (3)
  
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    DIVSS 204 - Study Abroad


    Within the School of Social Sciences at Saint Augustine’s University, classes are taught in English by Professors within the School. Students attend classes and lectures in a diverse, multicultural environment in a location outside of the Unites States of America. (6)
  
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    ECON 235 - Principles of Microeconomics


    Price theory, theory of the firm, and the interaction of demand and supply. (3)
  
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    ECON 236 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    Measure and determination of national income, employment and price, introduction to monetary and fiscal policy analysis, the effects of government deficits and debts, exchange rates and trade balances. (3)
  
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    ECON 237 - Principles of Urban Economics


    This course will introduce students to how microeconomics approaches urban planning problems. Through the course, the emphasis will be on developing your understanding of basic economic terms and reasoning; but the application, problem-solving, and policy analysis are directed to urban planning. Prerequisites: ECON 236 . (3)
  
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    ECON 436 - Money and Banking


    A study of money, financial markets, and the financial structure, with emphasis on commercial banks and the Federal Reserve System. Relationships between economic activity and the money supply are introduced. Prerequisites: ECON 235  and ECON 236 . (3)
  
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    EDUCA 114 - Bridge to Teaching


    This course introduces to education as a profession and a potential career. Students are exposed to public schools with diverse student populations through a minimum of 10 hours of field experiences. Field Experience clearance is required. Course is required for all students seeking admission into the Teacher Preparation Program. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 200 - Cooperative Education


    This work-study plan is designed to integrate the student’s academic experiences with practical experiences on the job. Students enrich their education by alternating institutional periods of study with practical periods of meaningful work in business, industry, health, social, and state agencies. Fee required. (6)
  
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    EDUCA 205 - Parallel Internship I


    Designed for Field-Site Learning. This course consists of a minimum of 90 hours in an approved on campus setting. It will provide the student with an opportunity to “Practice” on campus and under supervision the competencies acquired in the academic course. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 206 - Parallel Internship II


    Designed for Field-Site Learning. This course consists of a minimum of 90 hours in an approved off campus setting. It will provide the student with an opportunity to “Practice” off campus and under supervision the competencies acquired in the academic course. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 211 - Basic Test-Taking Skills - Reading


    In keeping with the theme devised by the Department of Education, Teacher as Mentor, this course expresses the vision and purpose of the program. Teachers as mentors possess strong communication skills. Emphasis will be placed on strengthening basic reading competencies in vocabulary acquisition as well as literal, critical and inferential comprehension. In conjunction with co-curricular activities, this course introduces students to techniques for improving Praxis I test-taking skills, pacing oneself during tests, and reducing test anxiety. Course may be waived based upon timely successful completion of the Praxis I Reading examination. (1)
  
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    EDUCA 212 - Basic Test-Taking Skills - Writing


    In keeping with the theme devised by the Department of Education, Teacher as Mentor, this course expresses the vision and purpose of the program. Teachers as mentors possess strong communication skills. Emphasis will be placed on strengthening basic writing competencies related to grammatical and structural relationships, idiomatic expression, mechanics and essay composition. In conjunction with co-curricular activities, this course introduces students to techniques for improving Praxis I test-taking skills, pacing oneself during tests, and reducing test anxiety. Course may be waived based upon timely successful completion of the Praxis I Writing examination. (1)
  
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    EDUCA 213 - Basic Test-Taking Skills - Mathematics


    In keeping with the theme devised by the Department of Education, Teacher as Mentor, this course expresses the vision and purpose of the program. Teachers as mentors are knowledgeable about content. Emphasis will be placed on developing basic math competencies related to conceptual and procedural knowledge, representations of quantitative information, measurement, informal geometry, and formal mathematical reasoning. In conjunction with co-curricular activities, this course introduces students to techniques for improving Praxis I test-taking skills, pacing oneself during tests, and reducing test anxiety. Course may be waived based upon timely successful completion of the Praxis I Math examination. (1)
  
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    EDUCA 233 - Interdisciplinary Seminar in Education


    This course provides students with a broad historical and sociological view of teaching and teacher education from its inception to current issues and trends. In addition, student will explore education law, ethics, finance, school governance and organization from both a local and international perspective. Course format is interactive and discussion-based. Course required of all students seeking admission to Teacher Education. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 235 - Exceptionalities


    This survey course introduces students to the mental, physical, emotional and social traits of several types of exceptional children. Learning characteristics of gifted, learning disabled and physically handicapped children will be studied. Using a case study approach, strategies for effective inclusion of children with exceptionalities in the regular classroom will be examined. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 241 - Technology Literacy for Teachers


    This course introduces education majors and pre-service teachers to current and emerging technologies that can be integrated into the K-5 classroom. Emphasis is placed on practical applications for K-5 content areas using computers, instructional software, desktop productivity tools, videos, digital cameras, projectors, internet, and web applications. Candidates will also explore resources in the community at large and become familiar with the challenges and issues faced when using technology with K-5 learners. Hybrid course model will be utilized. (2)
  
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    EDUCA 250 - Field Experiences I


    This is the introductory field-based practicum for Education majors only. Students are placed in public schools with diverse pupil populations under the supervision of certified teacher-mentors. During a parallel seminar with a program faculty supervisor, students learn specific classroom observation techniques. Students use observations to reflect upon various dimensions of life in a public school, including teaching methods, technology integration, classroom management strategies, learning styles and school climate. Required of all students seeking entry into the Teacher Preparation Program. Prerequisite: EDUCA 113 Bridge to Teaching. Pre-or co-requisite: EDUCA 233 - Interdisciplinary Seminar in Education . (2)
  
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    EDUCA 301 - North Carolina and the Global Connection


    The course is designed to give students content knowledge by examining and analyzing societal changes in North Carolina, particularly in regard to the economy, people and technology. Students will engage in a standards-based research project to deepen knowledge of North Carolina communities from a historical perspective. An investigation of the wide-ranging importance and context of events in our state’s history will enable students to grasp the concept of national and global interdependence. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program. (3) T1 AW
  
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    EDUCA 310 - Diversity and Family Focus


    This course explores instructional theory and practical ways to understand life in a diverse society related to teaching and learning in the elementary school. It also gives education majors/clinical practitioners principles and suggestions about how to involve parents/guardians in their child’s education to promote social, emotional, and academic growth. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 323 - Elementary Reading Instructional/Literacy Lab


    This course emphasizes theoretical and instructional issues in the development of key reading skills including phonics, phonemic awareness, comprehension, fluency and vocabulary development. In a school-based setting, students engage in tutorial sessions to assess and instruct emergent readers as they develop language and literacy skills. Selection and use of appropriate instructional materials including leveled texts and high quality children’s literature will be examined. Emphasis is consistently placed on the teacher’s facilitative role in meeting the needs of diverse learners, and on the goal of literacy as a tool for meaningful communication. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program. Co-requisite: EDUCA 350 - Field Experiences II . (3)
  
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    EDUCA 324 - Teaching the Language Arts


    This course investigates methods and materials used in teaching the language arts in grades K-5. Instructional techniques applicable to the teaching of spelling, handwriting, dramatics, and compositional skills will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program. (2)
  
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    EDUCA 325 - Teaching English Language Learners


    The primary purpose of this course is to provide the elementary teacher candidates with a fundamental understanding of theory and practice-based philosophy in order to support English Language Learners. Candidates will develop insight regarding critical aspects of second language development as they impact instruction in literacy. There will also be an emphasis on building a repertoire of culturally responsive approaches and strategies for teaching content-area subjects to English Language Learners. (2) PRE-REQUISITES: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program; EDUCA 323 - Elementary Reading Instructional/Literacy Lab 
  
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    EDUCA 326 - Language and Culture


    This course focuses on language and communication as windows into cultural diversity in an increasingly global society. Educational implications of linguistic differences will be explored. The course provides an overview of such topics as language prestige, standard English usage and the Ebonics debate, regional and stylistic dialects, code switching and language socialization. Students also learn strategies for helping children in linguistically diverse classrooms to maximize oral language capacities that celebrate their unique cultural traditions. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program; other majors by special permission of the course instructor. (2)
  
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    EDUCA 328 - Classroom Management and Behavior


    This field-based course presents best practices in classroom and behavior management. The course addresses concepts and best practices in organizing time, materials, classroom space, strategies for managing individual and large group student behaviors, transitions, lab activities, and other arrangements for general and inclusive classrooms. Candidates will examine basic federal and state laws as they pertain to the legal procedures for all theachers, including teachers of students with disabilities and ESL students. (3) Prerequisite: EDUCA 235 . Corequisite: EDUCA 330   (3)
  
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    EDUCA 329 - Classroom Management & Behavioral Analysis


    This course is an interactive field laboratory experience in which candidates learn, apply and practice the skills associated with curriculum design, instruction and learner assessment. Characteristics of effective and intentional teaching such as universal design, creating effective lessons using a variety of technologies, classroom management, and assessment of learners are among the topics addressed in this course. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 330 - Child Development


    This course is designed to cover the developmental milestones of child development from prenatal through the lower boundary of adolescence. The course addresses physical, social-emotional and cognitive development of children in grades K-5. The course affords students the opportunity to research and analyze the impact of social, family and economic factors that may inhibit ‘normal’ development. Particular attention is given to the impact of these variables on a child’s educational performance. Prerequisites: PSYCH 132 - Introduction to Psychology ; admission to Teacher Preparation Program. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 335 - Teaching Science in the Elementary School


    This course is designed to engage pre-service teachers in adapting appropriate teaching strategies to promote inquiry in teaching and learning science. The course will include aspects of designing curriculum units, planning standards-based lessons, fostering collaborating, integrating technology, and assessing students’ learning. Materials developed in this course may be used in practical classroom activities. Prerequisites: Two General Studies science courses and admission to Teacher Preparation Program. (2)
  
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    EDUCA 337 - Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School


    This course is designed to engage pre-service teachers in adapting appropriate teaching strategies to promote inquiry in teaching and learning Social Studies in the elementary classroom. The course will include aspects of designing integrated curriculum units, planning lessons, fostering dialogue, using technology, and assessing students’ learning. Materials developed in this course may be used in practical classroom activities. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program. (2)
  
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    EDUCA 338 - Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School


    This course focuses on how children learn and understand mathematics. Through interactive, constructivist experiences students develop materials and lessons that may be used during a practical classroom experience. The course examines the role of the teacher of mathematics in the elementary classroom and analyzes issues such as diversity, inquiry-based learning, integrated curricula, reflective practice, technology, and formative assessments in relation to student success in the area of mathematics. Prerequisites: MATH 233 - Modern Mathematics  and admission to Teacher Preparation Program. (2)
  
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    EDUCA 349 - Teaching Physical Education


    This course is designed to acquaint the prospective physical education teacher with methods and techniques for teaching physical education as well as the curriculum materials available in the secondary school physical education curriculum.  The North Carolina Standard Course of Study will be used for this course. (2)
  
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    EDUCA 350 - Field Experiences II


    This course is designed to provide pre-service teachers with first hand experiences in the elementary classroom setting. Candidates complete 40 hours of school-based field work, and are expected to provide tutorial assistance to individuals and small groups of students under the direction of a certified teacher-mentor. Weekly seminar sessions enable candidates to apply theoretical principles to practical experiences under the direction of the university supervisor. Prerequisites: EDUCA 250 - Field Experiences I ; admission to Teacher Preparation Program. (2)
  
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    EDUCA 360 - Exploring the Arts


    This course provides a survey of the basic vocabularies, materials, techniques, and thinking processes in the creation of the visual and performing arts. The teaching method is informed by the latest trends in art education and demonstrates how to motivate students to learn by integrating music, dance, visual art and theatre with other content areas. Useful for both general classroom teachers and art specialists, this course promotes art appreciation while also addressing instructional theory and methods. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 361 - Integrating the Arts into the Curriculum


    This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to design lesson plans that incorporate the arts into the content areas they will teach. It provides contextual background information about each art genre and introduces theories related to integrating the arts into the curriculum and the benefits to student learning. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program or by special permission of the instructor. Corequisites: EDUCA 324 , EDUCA 326 , EDUCA 335 , EDUCA 337 , EDUCA 338 . (3)
  
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    EDUCA 411 - Basic Test-Taking Skills - Praxis II


    This course focuses on developing skills that will be assessed and test-taking techniques to maximize candidates’ scores on licensing examinations. Students are required to take this course as they prepare for and complete the PRAXIS II examination. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program. (1)
  
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    EDUCA 426 - Teaching English Language Learners


    The primary purpose of this course is to provide the elementary teacher candidate with a fundamental understanding of theory and practice-based philosophy in order to support English language learners. Candidates will develop insight regarding critical aspects of second language development as they impact instruction in literacy. There will also be an emphasis on building a repertoire of culturally responsive approaches and strategies for teaching content-area subjects to English language learners. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program; EDUCA 323 - Elementary Reading Instructional/Literacy Lab . (3)
  
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    EDUCA 432 - Educational Assessments


    This course is designed to inform pre-service teachers regarding formative assessment and evaluation of students: both teacher-designed and web-based. It provides instruction in the principles of educational assessment, and how to develop plans that integrate instruction and assessment. Candidates will learn how to design various types of formative assessments that are carefully aligned with educational objectives and how to use the results in improving student achievement. Candidates will become familiar with selected standardized assessments along with concomitant elements, including reliability, validity, criterion reference and norming procedures. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program; MATH 233 - Modern Mathematics . (3)
  
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    EDUCA 450 - Field Experiences III


    This is a field-based practicum preceding the Student Teaching for Education majors only. Candidates are placed in classrooms with diverse student populations under the supervision of certified teacher-mentors. Candidates complete forty hours of school-based field work and are expected to provide instructional assistance to individuals, small and whole groups. This experience provides candidates with their first opportunity for full participation in classroom activities, including preparation of lesson plans, teaching a thematic unit, and conducting leadership-oriented projects. Weekly seminar sessions enable candidates to apply theoretical principles to practical experiences under the direction of the university supervisor. Prerequisites: EDUCA 250 , EDUCA 350  and admission to candidacy/Teacher Preparation Program. Co-requisite: EDUCA 451 - Action Research and Directed Field Experience . (3)
  
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    EDUCA 451 - Action Research and Directed Field Experience


    This field-based course examines action research and teacher inquiry within individual classroom, team, school and international contexts. Topics include an analysis of the different frameworks of action research, ways to identify problems to investigate, the selection of appropriate research methods, collecting and analyzing data, ways to draw conclusions from the research, and the relationship between our findings and educational theory. This experience provides candidates with their first opportunity for full participation in classroom activities under the guidance of cooperating school and program mentors. Field experience clearance is required. Pre-requisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program, EDUCA 323 , EDUCA 324 , EDUCA 328 , EDUCA 329 , EDUCA 330 , EDUCA 335 , EDUCA 337 , EDUCA 338 , EDUCA 361 . (3)
  
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    EDUCA 460 - Teacher Leadership


    This senior level course is designed to introduce candidates to the current trends related to teachers as leaders. Candidates will explore leadership-related projects including action research implementation, examinations of School Improvement Plans, participation in school-based professional learning communities, and collaboration with the Teacher Education Committee. This course will strengthen leadership skills through concurrent experiences carried out in Student Teaching. Finally, candidates will begin to develop personal leadership and management plans that extend into the induction phase of their teaching career. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program. Co-requisite: EDUCA 460 Student Teaching. (3)
  
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    EDUCA 461 - Student Teaching


    This course involves directed professional laboratory experiences, including sixty (60) or more hours of observation-participation and student teaching. Permission from the Teacher Education Department Chair and approval of the Teacher Education Committee are required. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program. Co-requisite: EDUCA 460 - Teacher Leadership . (12)
  
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    ENGL 123 - Reading and Argument


    This course takes an interactive view of reading to prepare active learners with strategies for successful reading comprehension and critical thinking. Students will focus on developing positive attitudes toward reading, increasing concentration while reading, and applying reading comprehension. Students will master study skills related to reading, including: textbook reading strategies, annotation, vocabulary development, and recognition of learning styles. The course is a prerequisite for incoming students needing additional instruction before taking ENGL 131 - English Composition I . Credits are not applicable to degree requirements. (3)
  
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    ENGL 130 - English Fundamentals


    This course provides students with a review of sentence and writing skills. Writing effective sentences through use of parallelism, exact word choice, and concise language will be covered. Students will practice solving common sentence problems such as run-ons, comma splices, fragments, and subject-verb agreement, and basic grammar will be reviewed. Students will write paragraphs in a variety of rhetorical modes and read both for content and for understanding structure. Credits are not applicable to degree requirements. (3)
 

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