Sep 21, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


TEP Acronyms

AL - Artistic Literacy IC - Innovation & Creativity SL - Servant Leadership
AW - Advanced Writing ID - Identity TECH - Computer Technology
CAP -  Capstone OC - Oral Communication TW - Teamwork
CT -  Critical Thinking QL - Math WC - Written Communication
FL - Foreign Language/Sign Language SCL - Science with Lab WEL - Wellness
GP - Global Perspective    

 

 
  
  •  

    ACCT 231 - Principles of Accounting I


    An introduction to generally accepted accounting principles and practices, with particular emphasis on the composition and meaning of financial statements. (Formally ACCT 234) (3)
  
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    ACCT 232 - Principles of Accounting II


    Continuation of ACCT 231 . The introduction to job-order costing, process costing, activity-based costing, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit relationships, variable costing, and profit planning. Prerequisites: ACCT 231 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 325 - Intermediate Accounting I


    The study of the conceptual framework of financial accounting and application of professional standards. In-depth analysis of valuation alternatives and their effects on income measurement. Prerequisites: ACCT 232 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 326 - Intermediate Accounting II


    A continuation of ACCT 325 . A study of accounting theory and techniques underlying the determination of contents and valuation of accounts for the financial statements of a going concern. Prerequisites: ACCT 325 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 333 - Tax Accounting I


    Introduction to federal taxation and the basic concepts and applications of federal tax law as they apply to individuals. Prerequisites: ACCT 232 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 334 - Tax Accounting II


    The study of federal taxation and the basic concepts and applications of federal corporate and partnership tax laws. Included is coverage of gift and estate planning. Prerequisites: ACCT 333 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 335 - Advanced Managerial Cost Accounting


    The study of standard costs, flexible budgets, segment reporting, profitability analysis, relevant costs, capital budgeting, investment decisions, service department costing, cash flows, and financial statement analysis. Prerequisites: ACCT 325 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 340 - Managerial Accounting


    This course will provide learners with an understanding of financial accounting, budgeting and financial analysis. Upon successful completion of this course, the learner will be able to understand financial and cost accounting and complete problems as applied to assets, bonds, financial statement analysis and cost accounting. (3)
  
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    ACCT 381 - Fraud Examination


    Study of internal and external fraud schemes with an emphasis on the basic skills needed to identity and investigate fraud. In addition, sociological and psychological theories of criminal behavior, laws, rules of evidence, the rights of persons under investigation, interrogation and interviewing, report writing, and ethics, will be discussed as these topics relate to fraud examination. (3)
  
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    ACCT 382 - Financial Forensic Investigations


    This course involves analyzing real-world “case” information as well as corporate and business records to determine if fraud has occurred. Students mimic investigative processes found in practice by conducting analytical reviews, soliciting information from clients, and reporting suspicious activity for a fictitious client company. Finally, students are required to testify to their findings a moot court scenario. Prerequisites: ACCT 381 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 441 - Advanced Accounting


    The study of accounting for business combinations, consolidated statements, branch operations, foreign operations, partnerships, governmental and not for profit accounting and current trends in financial reporting. Prerequisites: ACCT 232 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 443 - CPA Review


    Review and preparation for the CPA Examination; accounting practice, accounting theory, business law and auditing. Past CPA Examination problems are studied and solved. Prerequisites: ACCT 441 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 444 - Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting


    The study of theory and application of accounting within governmental and not-for-profit entities. Prerequisites: ACCT 232 . (3)
  
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    ACCT 445 - Accounting Information Systems


    The study of current and software used to process and monitor accounting data to enhance corporate governance. Topics include internal control systems, risk assessment, general and application control testing, computer assisted audit tools and techniques, and testing of databases and local area networks. (3)
  
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    ACCT 471 - Auditing


    The study of the conceptual and practical aspects of the examination of financial statements by independent accountants within the framework of generally accepted accounting principles and generally accepted auditing standards. Appropriate attention is also given to the objectives and distinguishing characteristics of internal and operational auditing, to EDP auditing, and to the importance and relevance of the Code of Professional Conduct. Prerequisites: ACCT 441 . (3)
  
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    AHMS 101 - Introduction to Human Nutrition


    Human Nutrition introduces the students to the basics of nutrition, diet, and a healthy eating lifestyle. This course will serve as a foundation for core concepts of nutrition regarding basic nutrition for the macro- and micro-nutrients, the composition of food, metabolism, diet planning, and basic nutrition and weight management. This course is open to all students. (3)
  
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    AHMS 210 - Medical Terminology


    This course will provide students with a basic medical terminology vocabulary for use in the healthcare setting. This knowledge will enable them to become successful communicators (especially in the health care setting). Thru the course and semester projects students will learn ways to become active community members and life-long learners. Prerequisites: BIOL 134 . (2)
  
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    AHMS 310 - HUMAN NUTRITION


    This course will provide students with an advanced knowledge of human nutrition and the application to human systems.  Students will study diseases that cause nutritional deficiencies and design nutritional assessments. This course will provide the student with the basic concept of nutrition and the relationship between nutrition and health.  The course will also review some basic biological and chemical concepts pertaining to the study of nutrition.

      Prequisites:  AHMS 210  , BIOL 133  , CHEM 141  , or permission of instructor.

  
  •  

    AHMS 320 - Introduction to Medical Biochemistry


    The Medical Biochemistry course is designed to provide the students with a fundamental understanding of current concepts of human biochemistry. This course is revised each year to update and improve its content. Hopefully the progression of topics will develop the subject in a fashion useful to the student, especially if he/she feels insecure about chemical and biochemical concepts. Interspersed throughout the course will be periodic clinical correlation lectures, relating to the current topics of the main lecture series. These are meant to illustrate the application of biochemical concepts to a variety of clinical circumstances. Prerequisites: CHEM 341  & CHEM 341L  , AHMS 210 . (4)
  
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    AHMS 330 - Pathologic Biochemistry


    Pathological biochemistry deals with disorders of biochemical pathways and biochemical changes in human organism under pathological situations. The discipline aims to explain diseases at the molecular level. Prerequisites: AHMS 320 . (4)
  
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    AHMS 440 - Introduction to Medical Physiology


    This course will provide students with an understanding of the normal function of cells, tissues, or organ systems of the human body. Prerequisites: AHMS 330 , BIOL 241 . (3)
  
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    AHMS 450 - Pathophysiology


    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of pathophysiology. Students examine the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function and the resulting human response. Upon completion of this course, students will understand pathophysiological changes, including how pathological process is manifested, progress in the body and primary and secondary effects. Prerequisites: AHMS 440  (3)
  
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    AHMS 460 - Principles of Clinical Pharmacology


    The general principles of pharmacokinetics in addition to anti-infective chemotherapeutic agents and various mediators of tissue responses will be discussed. A prior knowledge of basic physiology, anatomy and biochemistry is recommended to fully appreciate the topics discussed in this course. Prerequisites: AHMS 450  (4)
  
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    AHMS 470 - Human Gross Anatomy


    This course presents the students with an examination of the development of the human body. Regional perspectives of the anatomy will be examined utilizing clinical applications in order to gain a thorough comprehension of the core biological functions and anatomical engineering.  The anatomical regions covered are the back, thorax, abdomen, pelvic, upper extremities, lower extremities, and head/neck. The disciplines of physiology, embryology, histology, and anthropology will also be covered in order to understand the anatomy.  The design of the course will help prepare students interested in pursuing health related fields, ie., Pre-Medicine, Pre-Dental, Pre-Physical and Occupational Therapy, Pre-Physician Assistant, Nursing, Bio-Teachers, and Researchers. Prerequisites:  AHMS 210 BIOL 133 BIOL 241 PE 241   (3)
  
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    ART 100 - 2-D Design


    An introduction to the principles of design as applied to two-dimensions. This course, will challenge students to solve design intensive problems using traditional studio as well as computer-based technology. Art major priority. (3) T1 IC
  
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    ART 101 - 3-D Design


    Introduction of the principles of design as applied to three-dimensions. This course will challenge students to solve design intensive problems using traditional studio as well as computer-based technology. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 130 - Art Appreciation


    An introduction to the study of art and brief overview of art history. Emphasis is placed on the applications of art principles in everyday life. (3)
  
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    ART 131 - Introduction to Drawing


    An introduction to drawing techniques, using a variety of fine art media and differing strategies for approaching the drawn image. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 132 - Color and Design


    The study of surface, form, and color problems through a series of creative exercises and experiments. Theories of two- and three-dimensional principles governing composition, materials and techniques are explored. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 223 - Introduction to Painting


    An introduction to painting, which includes direct observation, visual analysis, design principles, and experimentation with painting technique. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 225 - Design Applications


    An introduction to basic computer graphics applications. Through experimentation and discussion of examples of professional graphics, the student will learn basic skills applicable in many fields and will be prepared to take advanced graphics design courses. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 226 - Typography


    This course will examine basic typography as a compositional tool and is an introduction to communication problem solving through the visual medium of language. The basic tenants such as parts of the letter, font families, specification, kerning, tracking, leading, visual spacing, text vs. display type, ligatures, avoiding widows, orphans, and rivers, appropriate use of hyphenation, alignment, etc., will be discussed and applied. Employing experimental and practical projects, the course will explore the architecture of type from a single letterform to an entire page layout. (3) T1 IC
  
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    ART 227 - Fundamentals of Photography


    An introduction to the basic operation and uses of a 35mm camera, as well as the fundamentals of Digital Photography using state-of-the-art digital, image manipulation tools. Students learn to use traditional 35mm cameras as well as producing and manipulating images on the computer. The work of commercial and fine art photographers will be explored, as well as the applications of photography in the design realm. A good camera (35mm preferably) is required. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 232 - Introduction to Ceramics


    Introduction to the ceramic process with an emphasis on sculpture and hand-building. Art Major priority. (3) T1 (F2012) AL
  
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    ART 234 - Survey in Print and Papermaking


    Investigation of traditional and experimental methods in printmaking and papermaking. Studio problems in woodcutting, embossing, cardboard printing, block printing, etc. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 235 - Introduction to Sculpture


    The study of contemporary approaches to sculpture, including the investigation of traditional and non-traditional materials, discussions of intellectual and personal content, and theoretical and historical strategies for understanding sculpture. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 236 - Survey in Craft I


    A survey of materials, tools, and processes used for craft activities in art and recreation programs. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 237 - Painting II


    A continuation of ART 143 (Introduction to Painting). Prerequisites: ART 143 or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 247 - Watercolor Painting


    Experimental exploration of wash, transparent watercolor, and opaque watercolor, their possibilities and limitations, with special techniques and pictorial problems. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 323 - Layout and Typography


    The layout and role of images (photos, illustrations, diagrams, graphics, motifs, etc.) in single and multiple-page designs containing type will be discussed and practiced. Using a sequence of assignments, this course concentrates on denotation, connotation, congruency between visual and verbal hierarchy, context and theme, image-type relationships and expression. Further exploration of text type and typographic specification and related technologies will also be investigated. Pre-press and technical production issues are also vital components of this course. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 326 - Illustration


    A study of applied design skills useful for students interested in working in illustration. Students create artwork designed in relation to a text and create visuals for fields of study which need a complement to other methods of presenting ideas. Prerequisites: ART 225  or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 327 - Graphic Design


    An exploration of techniques, programs, and ideas for advanced graphic design projects. Students will create advertisements and practically applicable designs as well as developing their own artistic styles and methods. Prerequisites: ART 225  or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 330 - Sculpture II


    A continuation of ART 235  (Introduction to Sculpture). Prerequisites: ART 235  or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 331 - Survey of Art History I


    An introduction to Prehistoric, Egyptian, Greek and Roman, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, Contemporary Western and Non-Western Art. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 332 - Survey of Art History II


    An introduction to Prehistoric, Egyptian, Greek and Roman, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, Contemporary Western and Non-Western Art. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 333 - Modern Art


    A study of contemporary art produced during the late 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. Prerequisites: ART 331  and ART 332  or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 334 - African-American Art History


    A historical study of art by African-American artists from ancient times to the present with emphasis on sculpture, architecture, painting, and crafts. Prerequisites: ART 331  and ART 332  or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 335 - Art of the Harlem Renaissance


    A study of painting and sculpture by African-American artists who flourished in U.S. cities, especially New York’s Harlem area, from 1920 to 1950. Includes exploration of early influences on the art of this era and its effect on later artists. Prerequisites: ART 331  and ART 332  or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 338 - Art of the Italian Renaissance


    A historical study of painting, architecture, and sculpture in Europe, especially Italy, from 1300 to 1600. Prerequisites: ART 331  and ART 332  or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 341 - Advanced Drawing


    A continuation of ART 131  (Intro to Drawing) Prerequisites: ART 131  and ART 223  or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 363 - Painting III


    A continuation of ART 237 . Prerequisites: ART 237 , or administrative approval (3)
  
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    ART 400 - Web/Multimedia Design


    Students will develop a command of web based software and create a student’s graphic design or studio portfolio web site. Prerequisites: Art major or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    ART 408 - Motion Graphics


    Elements of media are used to add movement to design for broadcasting, film footage, and animation. Arts majors or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    ART 409 - Graphic Design Studio


    Focus on individual concepts in graphic design with a long term goal of developing projects for a portfolio. Arts majors or instructor approval. (3)
  
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    ART 410 - Graphic Design Studio


    This course is concerned with developing the student’s confidence and competence in creating form and concepts. Students are prompted to take risks to develop their own voice as designers, as well as to expand the vocabulary with which they express ideas by employing visual rhetorical strategies such as metaphors, puns, irony, metonymy, etc. Simultaneously, students are encouraged to explore formal possibilities while developing work that communicates an intended message, resulting in work that is meaningful, compelling and engaging. A design process of research, ideation, thumbnails, roughs, design development and final presentation will be employed. This course will comprise image design - the communication of ideas through imagery, and typography where students pursue the effective transmission of content. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 411 - Studio Portfolio


    Focus on the development of individual direction in painting, sculpture, and/or graphic art. Students will meet regularly with instructor to experiment and explore problems chosen by both student and instructor. Emphasis is given to individual analysis, discussion of work, and development of a professional portfolio. Prerequisites: Art majors, Senior Standing. (3)
  
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    ART 412 - Graphic Design Portfolio


    This course focuses on professional level projects in graphic design to create a graduate portfolio. Students will meet regularly with the instructor to discuss the projects chosen by the student and the instructor. Prerequisites: Art majors, Senior Standing. (3)
  
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    ART 413 - Internship


    An internship program for students ready for professional experience in their field of study. Students are placed by the instructor in museums, galleries, and design firms in the Raleigh area. Prerequisites: Art majors, Junior or Senior Standing. (3)
  
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    ART 434 - Advanced Painting


    Concentrated studio pursuit and development of a strong personal statement through painting. Individual instruction and group criticism of student work. Prerequisites: ART 237  or ART 347 or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 435 - Advanced Sculpture


    Concentrated studio pursuit and development of a strong personal sculptural statement. Individual instruction and group criticism of work. Prerequisites: ART 330 . (3)
  
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    ART 438 - Modern Abstract Painting and Drawing


    Personal directions in contemporary painting with emphasis on issues concerning post-modern artist, individual and group criticism. Art major priority. (3)
  
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    ART 441 - Life Drawing


    Introduction to drawing human figures using a variety of fine art media. Prerequisites: ART 131  or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 462 - Project Seminar


    Students will develop a series of art works investigating problems that are of special interest to them. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior art major or minor or non-major with administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ART 491 - Studio Problems


    Students will have the opportunity to design artworks based on a series of problems pertinent to their interest and needs. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior art major or minor or administrative approval. (3)
  
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    ASL 131 - American Sign Language I


    This is the first course in a two-part series. Students will learn basic ASL communication. The course includes sign vocabulary, finger spelling, numbers and expressive and receptive signing activities as well as history of ASL and becoming knowledgeable of aspects of the hearing-impaired Culture which is an integral part of meaningful language use. (3)
  
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    ASL 132 - American Sign Language II


    This is the second course in a two-part ASL series. Students will continue to develop receptive and expressive proficiency in ASL by expanding their sign vocabulary, enhancing their knowledge and application of accurate grammatical points of the language, and building upon their knowledge of the Deaf and hearing impaired culture, an integral part of meaningful language use. (3)
  
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    ATH 235 - Emergency Medical Training


    The Emergency Medical Training (Responder) course prepares students to become EMT-Basic professionals. The student is trained to provide emergency prehospital assessment and care for patients of all ages during trauma or a crisis with a variety of medical and traumatic injuries. The course covers introduction to emergency medical services systems, roles and responsibilities of EMTs, anatomy and physiology, medical emergencies, and trauma. Prerequisites: PE 226 , AHMS 210  (3)
  
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    ATH 285 - Lower Extremity Evaluation


    This course offers an intensive study of anatomy and physiology, goniometry of the lower extremities, hips, pelvis, and lower back. Student will identify signs, symptoms and pathology of common sports injuries of the lower extremity and axial region. The evaluation process will include histories, observation, palpation, range of motion, joint stability, muscle function and special tests. Prerequisites: PE 241 , AHMS 210 . (3)
  
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    ATH 295 - Upper Extremity Evaluation


    This course offers an intensive study of anatomy and physiology, goniometry of the upper extremities spine, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, head, neck, facial, abdominal. Student will identify signs, symptoms and pathology of common sports injuries of the upper extremity and integrated evaluation techniques for the unconscious athlete/patient. The evaluation process will include histories, observation, palpation, range of motion, joint stability, muscle function and special tests. Prerequisites: PE 241 , AHMS 210 . (3)
  
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    ATH 305 - Athletic Training Field Experience I


    This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to develop competencies and proficiency in the area of athletic training. Emphasis will be placed on level specific knowledge, development, demonstration, and clinical skills. Students will observe and participate in health care given to Athletes in the athletic training environment, such as, daily operations of the athletic training room. It is the first course of a 4 course series. The courses must be taken in sequential order and successful completion of the previous course (level) is required for enrollment in the next course (level). Student will work under direct supervision of a BOC-certified athletic trainer/clinical instructor. 150 hours of clinical experience required. Prerequisites: PE 221 , PE 224 , PE 226 , PE 241 , AHMS 210 . (1)
  
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    ATH 315 - Athletic Training Field Experience II


    This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to develop competencies and proficiency in the area of athletic training. Emphasis will be placed on level specific knowledge, development, demonstration, and clinical skills. Students will observe and participate in health care given to Athletes in the athletic training environment, such as, daily operations of the athletic training room. It is the second course of a 4 course series. The courses must be taken in sequential order and successful completion of the previous course (level) is required for enrollment in the next course (level). Student will work under direct supervision of a BOC-certified athletic trainer/clinical instructor. 150 hours of clinical experience required. Prerequisites: ATH 305 . (1)
  
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    ATH 355 - Therapeutic Modalities


    This course offers an intensive study and hands on training of manual, mechanical, acoustic, thermal, cryo, and electromagnetic therapeutic agents used by athletic trainers for treatment of muscuoskeletal injuries and disorders. Emphasis is placed on physiological effects, therapeutic indications and contraindications, pain management, inflammatory responses, and evidence-based clinical decision making. Prerequisites: PE 226 , PE 241 , AHMS 210 , ATH 315   (3)
  
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    ATH 365 - Therapeutic Exercise


    This course offers an intensive study and hands on training of the theory and application of exercise prescription and implementation of a comprehensive rehabilitation/reconditioning program for injuries/illnesses sustained during physical/athletic activity. Students will study the application of therapeutic exercise equipment for the rehabilitation/reconditioning of athletic injuries. Techniques of resistance training and cardiovascular conditioning will be studied for prevention of sports injuries. Prerequisites: ATH 355 , AHMS 210   (3)
  
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    ATH 375 - Sports and Exercise Psychology


    This course is designed to introduce students to the psychological factors that influence individual and group sport and exercise participation and performance. Various mental training skills can enhance one’s athletic performance; therefore, the areas of stress, motivation, goal-setting, leadership, and imagery will be explored. Students will review psychological skills training (PST) techniques used to enhance sport and exercise performance. The issues of management of eating disorders, substance abuse, burnout, overtraining, self-confidence, motivation, anxiety, stress management, concentration, attention control, visualization, leadership, group cohesion, and communication will be covered. Prerequisites: PE 226 , AHMS 210 , ATH 315   (3)
  
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    ATH 385 - Orthopedic Evaluation in Sports Medicine


    This course is designed to give the students and opportunity to monitor the methods and techniques that certified physician’s use to detect and diagnose athletic or physical injuries. Students will be introduced to the concepts of sports medicine and the diagnosis, management, and rehabilitation, resulting in patient/athletes return to play/work. Prerequisites: Senor Status (1)
  
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    ATH 405 - Athletic Training Field Experience III


    This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to develop competencies and proficiency in the area of athletic training. Emphasis will be placed on level specific knowledge, development, demonstration, and clinical skills. Students will observe and participate in health care given to Athletes in the athletic training environment, such as, daily operations of the athletic training room. It is the third course of a 4 course series. The courses must be taken in sequential order and successful completion of the previous course (level) is required for enrollment in the next course (level). Student will work under direct supervision of a BOC-certified athletic trainer/clinical instructor. 150 hours of clinical experience required. Prerequisites: ATH 315  (1)
  
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    ATH 415 - Athletic Training Field Experience IV


    This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to develop competencies and proficiency in the area of athletic training. Emphasis will be placed on level specific knowledge, development, demonstration, and clinical skills. Students will observe and participate in health care given to Athletes in the athletic training environment, such as, daily operations of the athletic training room. It is the fourth course of a 4 course series. The courses must be taken in sequential order and successful completion of the previous course (level) is required for enrollment in the next course (level). Student will work under direct supervision of a BOC-certified athletic trainer/clinical instructor. 150 hours of clinical experience required. Prerequisites: ATH 405  (1)
  
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    ATH 425 - Organization and Administration in Athletic Training


    This course is designed to study the administrative issues and management theories encountered in athletic training. Emphasis will be placed on the concepts of legal liability, facility design and maintenance, documentation, financial management, information management, health insurance, and general day to day operations. Techniques used in human resources will also be explored, such as, staffing, employment techniques and the formal interview process. Also, understand research and information on current sports medicine policies and guidelines mandated by national athletic training governing organization. Prerequisites: Senior Status (3)
  
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    ATH 435 - Internship in Athletic Training


    This course is designed to give students an opportunity to gain practical experience in a private clinic, educational setting, rehabilitation facility, or sports organization which is involved in athletic/rehabilitation health care. The students will gain on the job learning experience at an off campus jobsite. They will be required to write a research paper outlining their day to day experiences. Prerequisites: Senior Status (4)
  
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    BIOL 131 - Fundamentals of Biology


    (For Non-Majors) Considers the philosophy of science; the scientific method; the nature and organization of living matter; structure-function relationships; principles of development, growth, reproduction, and metabolism, the relationship of heredity and ecology to behavior; conservation, taxonomy, and evolution. (3)
  
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    BIOL 131L - Fundamentals of Biology Laboratory


    Laboratory work includes training in the use of the microscope; the study of various taxonomic groups, experiments in heredity, genetics, taxonomy, and physiology. Fee required (2 hours per week) (1)
  
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    BIOL 133 - Principles of Biology I


    An introduction and exploration of the study of life from atoms to the cellular levels of organization. Emphasis is placed on structure and function of cells, evolution, molecular genetics and energy transformation. (3)
  
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    BIOL 133L - Principles of Biology I Laboratory


    Laboratory investigations focused on cellular and molecular biology. Fee and Lab Jacket required (3 hours per week) (1)
  
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    BIOL 134 - Principles of Biology II


    Emphasis is placed on the organism and higher levels of biological organization. Topics will include biodiversity, plants and animals form and function and ecology. Prerequisites: BIOL 133 . (3)
  
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    BIOL 134L - Principles of Biology II Laboratory


    Laboratory investigations focused on the organism. Plant and animal dissections will occur. Prerequisites: BIOL 133, BIOL 133L . Fee and Lab Jacket required (3 hours per week) (1)
  
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    BIOL 141 - Invertebrate Zoology


    Emphasis is placed on the structure, evolution, and physiology of invertebrate animals, marine groups, Helminthes, and insects. Prerequisites: BIOL 134 . (3)
  
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    BIOL 141L - Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory


    Laboratory emphasis will be placed on the identification and physiology of invertebrates. Prerequisites: BIOL 134L . Fee and Lab Jacket required. (3 hours per week) Fall (1)
  
  •  

    BIOL 142 - General Botany


    Theories, principles, and concepts of plant life. Lectures concentrated on the basic structures, economic importance, physiological phenomena, and taxonomic survey of the plant kingdom. Prerequisites: BIOL 133 . (3)
  
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    BIOL 142L - General Botany Laboratory


    Study of the basic structure and taxonomic survey of the plant kingdom. Prerequisites: BIOL 133L . Fee and Lab Jacket required (3 hours per week) (1)
  
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    BIOL 201 - General Ecology


    Fundamental principles of ecology. Subject matter integrates various aspects of the following: plant and animal ecology, basic and applied ecology, empirical and theoretical ecology. The importance of evolutionary adaptations in ecological phenomenon is also emphasized. Prerequisites: BIOL 142 . (3)
  
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    BIOL 201L - General Ecology Laboratory


    The laboratory includes field trips and studies of local natural ecosystems. Prerequisites: BIOL 142L . Fee and Lab Jacket required. (3 hours per week) (1)
  
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    BIOL 241 - Anatomy and Physiology


    A rigorous course in anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on human anatomy and human physiology. Understanding human anatomy and human physiology, know the major functions of the organs comprising the human body, and to understand the effects of disease (nutritional, pathogenic, genetic) upon the physiology of the human body. Prerequisites: BIOL 134 . (3)
  
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    BIOL 241L - Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory


    A laboratory course in anatomy and physiology with an emphasis on human anatomy and human physiology. Understanding human anatomy and human physiology, know the major functions of the organs comprising the human body, and to understand the effects of disease (nutritional, pathogenic, genetic) upon the physiology of the human body. Prerequisites: BIOL 241 . (1)
  
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    BIOL 242 - Embryology


    The focus of this course is on the anatomy of vertebrate embryogenesis with specific emphasis on humans. Topics include fertilization, implantation, gastrulation, neurulation and organogenesis of a variety of structures. Prerequisites: BIOL 241 . (3)
  
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    BIOL 242L - Embryology Lab


    To observe the embryological development of various organisms and to demonstrate how in multicellular organisms, successive generations of embryonic cells form by cell division, and that all organisms begin their life cycles as a single cell. Prerequisites: BIOL 241L . Fee and Long Lab Jacket required (4 hours per week) (1)
  
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    BIOL 310 - Molecular Cell Biology


    An in-depth study of the structure, function and biochemistry of cells will be the focus here. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of the structure, physiology and biochemistry of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids in coordinating cellular. Prerequisites:  BIOL 133  , BIOL 134  . (3)
  
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    BIOL 310L - Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory


    An in-depth laboratory study of the structure, function and biochemistry of cells will be the focus here. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of the structure, physiology and biochemistry of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids in coordinating cellular. Prerequisites: BIOL 134  , BIOL 134L  . (1)
  
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    BIOL 325 - Ethics in Research


    A rigorous course in professionalism, scientific ethics, and the responsible conduct of science. Topics to include: honesty and integrity in research; authorship; fraud; plagiarism; safety; sexual harassment; consulting agreements; service as expert witnesses; press relations; ethical treatment of animal and human subjects; ethics of teaching and mentoring; and the role of the scientist in society. (3)
  
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    BIOL 332 - Microbiology and Immunology


    An introduction to the structure, biochemistry, physiology, ecology and immunological relationships of microorganisms and their hosts. The basic biochemical, nutritional, metabolism, genetics, resistance, infections, physical-chemical control and chemotherapeutic agents will be explored. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 . (3)
  
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    BIOL 332L - Microbiology and Immunology Laboratory


    A laboratory that introduces to the hands on study of the structure, biochemistry, physiology, ecology and immunological relationships of microorganisms and their hosts. The basic biochemical, nutritional, metabolism, genetics, resistance, infections physical-chemical control and the activity of chemotherapeutic agents will be explored. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 . (1)
 

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